Verso

Posted on Dec. 8, 2021 by Sandy Masuo
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Toyon is brightening winter landscapes throughout Southern California, including here at The Huntington ...

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Nov. 24, 2021 by Kathy Musial
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On Sept. 24, 2021, a Queensland kauri (Agathis robusta) in The Huntington's Rose Garden was designated as a California Big Tree, The Huntington's first such honor. On Nov. 5, Matt Ritter, professor of...
Nov. 17, 2021 by Dennis Carr
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This year, The Huntington acquired a striking portrait of Moanahonga (Great Walker), an Ioway chief, painted around 1824 by the American artist Charles Bird King ...
Oct. 13, 2021 by Lucy Arnold
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Hilary Mantel, whose literary archive is held at The Huntington, is one of the most critically acclaimed authors working today ...
Sep. 29, 2021 by Cheryl Cheng
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Calligraphy is one of the oldest and most esteemed art forms in China. Its distinctive quality arises from its duality as both a visual art form and a means of written communication. This becomes apparent...
Sep. 22, 2021 by Clay Stalls
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The Huntington has deep collections on the history of Spanish-speaking North America created from a centurylong record of acquiring materials in this field ...
Aug. 10, 2021 by Sean Lahmeyer
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Soon after Henry E. Huntington purchased the San Marino Ranch (formerly owned by James DeBarth Shorb) in 1903, he learned that many agricultural crops—such as avocados, peaches, and nuts—could be grown...
Jul. 28, 2021 by Manuela Gomez Rhine
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Several of the objects on display in the upcoming exhibition, “What Now: Collecting for the Library in the 21st Century, Part 2,” provide windows into The Huntington’s array of collections that support...
Jul. 7, 2021 by Sara K. Austin
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What sparks the lightning bolt of insight? How do we come to see with new eyes? Literature can expose us to perspectives strange to us, but our interpretations can also be clouded by familiarity ...
Jun. 23, 2021 by Olga Tsapina
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In March 1852, Charles Devens, the United States Marshal for Massachusetts, submitted an expense report ...
Jun. 16, 2021 by Manuela Gomez Rhine
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Harriet Goodhue Hosmer (1830-1908) unapologetically pursued her ambitions as a sculptor in a field considered inappropriate for women and lived openly as a lesbian ...
Jun. 9, 2021 by Natalie Russell
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Born in Dublin and named for Irish folk heroes, Oscar Fingal O’Flahertie Wills Wilde (1854–1900) became a cultural hero in his own right ...
Jun. 2, 2021 by Lisa Blackburn
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Offerings of fruit, rice cakes, fish, and wine; humble gifts of pine sprigs; scatterings of salt; rhythmic chants; and a taiko drum’s deep resonant tones soaring skyward to invoke the spirits. These...
May. 5, 2021 by Lisa Blackburn
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Experts on nomenclature—from Madison Avenue marketing executives to the parents of newborn babies—have long believed that choosing the right name can make all the difference ...
Apr. 22, 2021 by Natalie Russell
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Archives are full of mysteries. Many manuscripts are undated. Often letters are addressed to first names and signed with initials. Accurately identifying and describing an item can be a research project...
Apr. 19, 2021 by Giovana Romano Sanchez
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Featuring the work of 30 emerging and under-recognized artists from the greater Los Angeles area, "Made in L.A. 2020: a version" presents mirroring exhibitions at the Hammer Museum and The Huntington—as...
Apr. 13, 2021 by Elaine Hobby
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In 1984, The Huntington organized and hosted the first of a series of meetings of local feminists. As a brochure in the Library’s archives explains, these seminars, scheduled to take place five times...