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Posted on Jan. 16, 2019 by Nicholas Menzies and Phillip E. Bloom
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In just three characters, Terry Yuan's calligraphic Terrace that Invites the Mountain—now carved into a rock in The Huntington's Chinese Garden, Liu Fang Yuan—captures one of the key principles...

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Jan. 9, 2019 by Norman Jones and Paulina Kewes
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On March 24, 1603, Queen Elizabeth I died, and James VI of Scotland was proclaimed James I of England. There was widespread relief and rejoicing that the transition happened so smoothly ...
Jan. 2, 2019 by Lynne Heffley
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Tall and amiable, wearing glasses, his hair tied back in a pony tail, contemporary artist Tang Qingnian 唐慶年 stands in The Huntington's Rose Hills Garden Courtyard on a sunny day in early Nov....
Dec. 26, 2018 by Kevin Durkin
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As the year draws to a close, we invite you to revisit a dozen of our favorite stories from this year's Verso offerings. ...
Dec. 19, 2018 by Linda Chiavaroli
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Countless novelists, composers, poets, and playwrights have sourced Italy's Venice for their creations. Somewhat less prominent on the cultural radar are the visionary developers, marketing-savvy citrus...
Dec. 13, 2018 by Usha Lee McFarling
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For years, the boxy myrtle hedges running through the heart of the Rose Garden have concerned Tom Carruth, the E.L. and Ruth B. Shannon Curator of the Rose Collections at The Huntington. ...
Dec. 6, 2018 by Stephen Bending and Jennifer Milam
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What do we mean by an "English," a "French," or an "American" garden? What are the differences between them in the early modern transatlantic world, and what might they—or those who experience them—still...
Dec. 3, 2018 by Vanessa Wilkie
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The family feud between England's Queen Elizabeth I (1533–1603) and her cousin, the Scottish Queen Mary (1542–1587)—not "Bloody" Mary, Elizabeth's half-sister—has fascinated people since the...
Nov. 29, 2018 by Thea Page
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Something rare and golden will be unveiled in the Huntington Art Gallery this weekend. Beginning Dec. 1, four tempera-with-gold-leaf panels from an altarpiece by Florentine Renaissance master Cosimo...
Nov. 21, 2018 by Carribean Fragoza
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When push comes to shove, there are two kinds of people in the world. The kind who will either run away from a fire or a fist fight, and the kind who will run toward it to get a closer look. ...
Nov. 14, 2018 by Seth LeJacq
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The French surgeon Ambroise Paré occupies a curious place in medical history. He is a towering figure in Renaissance medicine and the history of surgery, and yet relatively unknown, especially next...
Nov. 7, 2018 by Mary E. Fissell
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When we analyze an early-modern medical book nowadays, we often read it on Early English Books Online (EEBO), Google Books, or a similar platform. While such digitization has opened up all kinds of...
Oct. 30, 2018 by Olga Tsapina
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Few documents of the Founding era were more admired in the United States before the Civil War than George Washington's Farewell Address. Americans liked to think of themselves as the same nation to...
Oct. 24, 2018 by Ann Scheid
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Documentary filmmaker and six-time Emmy Award-winner Karyl Evans will present a screening of her film "The Life and Gardens of Beatrix Farrand" at 7:30 p.m. on Monday, Nov. 12 in The Huntington's Rothenberg...
Oct. 17, 2018 by Lynne Heffley
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It was an auspicious omen. At dusk, during a mid-September rehearsal of Nightwalk in the Chinese Garden—The Huntington's first-ever, site-specific, evening theatrical production—"these huge wild...
Oct. 10, 2018 by Jennifer L. Anderson and Anya Zilberstein
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Many today are familiar with Ireland's Great Potato Famine, the ecological and social calamity (exacerbated by misguided British policies) that resulted in mass starvation and an exodus of immigrants...
Oct. 3, 2018 by Linda Chiavaroli
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Between World War I and World War II, Los Angeles experienced rapid growth, attracting new, talented architects both locally and from other parts of the U.S... ...
Sep. 26, 2018 by Carribean Fragoza
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"Qhip nayr uñtasis sarnaqapxañani" is an aphorism of the Aymara people, an indigenous nation that spans Peru, Bolivia, and Chile. The saying, which roughly translates to "looking back to walk forth,"...
Sep. 19, 2018 by Thea Page
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In an exciting "first" for The Huntington, visitors this fall will be able to watch and learn about the conservation treatment of Thomas Gainsborough's iconic masterpiece The Blue Boy through a special...
Sep. 12, 2018 by Joan Waugh and Gary W. Gallagher
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The American Civil War witnessed dramatic shifts of momentum. As armies contended for supremacy on the battlefield, their successes and failures profoundly shaped politics and civilian morale on the...
Sep. 5, 2018 by Lisa Blackburn
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