Videos and Recorded Programs

Photograph of English manor in ruins
Lecture
Hamlet and Other Ghost Stories
Nov. 13, 2019

Henry Huntington acquired one of the rarest books in the history of English literature: the so-called "bad quarto" of Hamlet. Zachary Lesser, professor of English at the University of Pennsylvania, discusses how this book's discovery in 1823 transformed our ideas about Hamlet, how it made its way to The Huntington, and what can we learn through this book's history about modern libraries.

 

Search Videos and Recorded Programs

 

Most Recent

Open gate of a Chinese Garden
Lecture
Gardens as Ecological Theater: An 18th-Century Story
Sep. 26, 2019

Eugene Wang, professor of art history at Harvard University, discusses the Qianlong Garden in the northeast corner of the Forbidden City. Built in the 1770s, the whole garden space can be seen as a five-act play.

 
Old photograph of workhouse
Lecture
Slavery Matters
Sep. 25, 2019

James Walvin, professor emeritus at the University of York and the Los Angeles Times Distinguished Fellow at The Huntington, discusses the widespread global ramifications of African slavery that transformed the cultural habits of millions of people.

 
Photograph of Wallace Stevens
Conference
Sincerely Yours, Wallace Stevens
Sep. 21, 2019

Wallace Stevens is regarded as one of the great American poets, yet he was also an inimitable letter writer. Leading international experts make the first concerted effort to study Stevens' letters as a major part of the poet's literary heritage.

 
Photo of Henry Huntington
Video
Nineteen Nineteen
Sep. 20, 2019

Organized around themes defined by the verbs "Fight," "Return," "Map," "Move," and "Build," the exhibition "Nineteen Nineteen" showcases items that embody an era in flux. Rare books, posters, letters, photographs, diaries, paintings, sculpture, and ephemera will be on view. Highlights include representative items from 1919, such as a 37-foot map of a Pacific Electric (Red Car) route in Los Angeles, astronomical photographs of the moon and constellations, German Revolution posters, and suffragist pamphlets, alongside important works acquired by Henry E. Huntington in the lead-up to that year, including the original manuscript of Benjamin Franklin's Autobiography, the journal of Aaron Burr, and the memoirs of Gen. William T. Sherman.

 
Cover of In the Country of Women by Susan Straight
Lecture
In Conversation: Susan Straight: In the Country of Women
Sep. 16, 2019

Award-winning author Susan Straight is joined by novelist Lisa See for a conversation about Straight's powerful new memoir, In the Country of Women, which traces the lives of six generations of immigrant and multiracial women in her extended family. The program is presented by the Huntington–USC Institute on California and the West. Book signing follows the program.

ICW logo

 
box of oranges
Video
The Last Orange Grove in Town
Sep. 5, 2019

In 1919, Henry and Arabella Huntington signed the trust indenture that formed The Huntington. But in 1919 this was still a working ranch; the library was still under construction; and Henry was still gung-ho for a citrus operation that he hoped would subsidize his plans for a public institution.

 
California ranch
Lecture
California Ranches: Lands in Transition
Aug. 5, 2019

Architect Marc Appleton, author of "Ranches: Home on the Range in California", discusses the history of cattle ranching in California. Once a robust industry in the state, ranching is now a much diminished and challenged enterprise, says Appleton, and many ranchers are witnessing the passing of a way of life.  Listen

 

 
photograph of old pump house
Lecture
Revolutionary Machine: How Pumps Shaped Modern California
Jun. 12, 2019

Historian Steven Usselman traces how one breakthrough technology—the deep well centrifugal pump—triggered an unfolding cascade of change that reshaped the Golden State, both literally and figuratively. Conceived for use on citrus ranches such as those owned by Henry Huntington, these intricate mechanical marvels spilled over into many domains, including water management, food processing, oil drilling, and aviation.

 
photograph of Richard Neutra, landscape architect
Lecture
Richard Neutra, Landscape Architect
Jun. 3, 2019

Architectural historian Barbara Lamprecht explores a little known but key aspect of Richard Neutra's unique contribution to architecture: designing environments that fused constructions and site to create "soul anchorages" or "habitats." Renowned for his sleek interpretations of Modernism, Neutra's first job after World War I was as a gardening assistant to one of Switzerland's most famous early purveyors of Modern landscape design. Neutra later integrated his knowledge of plants with ideas about evolutionary biology's role in human well-being. The program is presented as part of the California Garden & Landscape History Society Lecture Series.

 
image of old Chinatown menus
Video
The Old Menus of New Chinatown
May 29, 2019

Li Wei Yang, curator of the Pacific Rim Collection at The Huntington, retraces the history of Chinatown in Los Angeles using old Chinese Restaurant menus from the You Chung Hong Family Collection.

 
Lecture
America's First Botanical Garden
May 23, 2019

Historian Victoria Johnson discusses the life of David Hosack, the attending physician at the Hamilton-Burr duel and founder of the nation's first public botanical garden, today the site of Rockefeller Center. Johnson is the author of the Pulitzer Prize-nominated biography of Hosack, American Eden: David Hosack, Botany, and Medicine in the Garden of the Early Republic.

 
Lecture
The Browns of California: A Conversation with Governor Jerry Brown
May 21, 2019

The Browns of California: A Conversation with Governor Jerry Brown and Miriam Pawel, moderated by William Deverell. The program is presented by the Huntington–USC Institute on California and the West.

ICW logo