Videos and Recorded Programs

Portrait of Meg Whitman
Lecture
Centennial Paul Haaga Jr. Program on American Entrepreneurship
Jan. 13, 2020

Paul G. Haaga Jr., Huntington Trustee emeritus, chair of the board of NPR, and retired chair of Capital Research and Management Company, in conversation with Meg Whitman, CEO of Quibi, former president and CEO of Hewlett Packard Enterprise and eBay Inc., and 2010 Republican nominee for governor of California.

 

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Susan Orlean and Viet Thanh Nguyen
Lecture
President’s Series: Susan Orlean and Viet Thanh Nguyen
Nov. 4, 2019

A conversation between authors Susan Orlean (The Library Book) and Viet Thanh Nguyen (The Sympathizer) and moderated by William Deverell, director of the Huntington-USC Institute on California and the West.

 
Strange Science graphic
Lecture
Strange Science of Astronomy: Past and Present
Oct. 29, 2019

An esteemed panel of astronomers, historians, and engineers explore astronomy's fantastical theories and fascinating discoveries with moderator and Caltech university archivist Peter Sachs Collopy. Panelists include Tracy Drain, JPL Psyche mission deputy project systems engineer; Eun-Joo Ahn, astrophysicist and graduate student in history at UCSB; W. Patrick McCray, professor of history at UCSB; and John Mulchaey, Crawford H. Greenewalt Chair and Director of the Carnegie Observatories.

 
Lecture
Paper Son: The Inspiring Story of Tyrus Wong, Immigrant and Artist
Oct. 27, 2019

Author Julie Leung and illustrator Chris Sasaki discuss the inspiring true story behind their children's book, Paper Son. Li Wei Yang, curator of Pacific Rim Collections at The Huntington, introduces the program and offers historical context. A book signing follows the talk.

 
b/w photo of Henry Huntington as a child
Lecture
The Founder and the Future: Becoming Henry Huntington
Oct. 23, 2019

William Deverell, director of the Huntington-USC Institute on California and the West, explores the life of Henry E. Huntington (1850-1927) against the backdrop of American history. This program is a Haynes Foundation Lecture.

 
Photograph of ethnobotanist Richard Schultes
Lecture
Life and Times of Ethnobotanist Richard Schultes in the Amazon
Oct. 20, 2019

Noted ethnobotanist Mark Plotkin and cartographer Brian Hettler of the Amazon Conservation Team discuss the work of Richard Schultes, the 20th-century ethnobotanist, and share their new interactive map, based on the explorer's journals, that tracks his Amazon travels and offers insights into his role in the development of the field of ethnobotany in the US.

 
Engraving of dancing people in 1919
Conference
In America, Nineteen Nineteen
Oct. 18, 2019

The year 1919 was a tumultuous one in American history. It was also the year that Henry E. Huntington created the institution that bears his name. This conference, designed around The Huntington's Nineteen Nineteen centennial exhibition, focuses on the social, cultural, and political events that provide a national and international context for Huntington's remarkable act of philanthropy.

 
Lecture
Recasting the King of Flowers in Late Imperial China
Oct. 17, 2019

Kristen L. Chiem, associate professor of art history at Pepperdine University, explores the role of floral imagery in Qing-dynasty China. Focusing on the peony, Chiem traces how artists used the flower to demonstrate imperial power during the 17th through 20th centuries. Prominently adorning portraits and material objects of Qing emperors and empresses, these images offer insight into gender, ethnicity, and diplomacy at court.

 
19th century photo
Lecture
Locked in his Private Room: A Teenager's View of the Last Days of George Armstrong Custer
Oct. 9, 2019

Researcher T.J. Stiles describes the last year of Custer's life through the eyes of teenager Bertie Swett. Swett came to know Custer and his wife Libbie at Fort Abraham Lincoln and in Manhattan while America approached a historic turning point. Swett bared witness to the notorious soldier's life as he pushed his career and fortune to the brink of disaster.

 
Print of early modern astronomers
Lecture
“With a sincere hand and a faithful eye”: The Visual Culture of Early Modern Science
Oct. 3, 2019

Sachiko Kusukawa, professor of the history of science at the University of Cambridge, explores the many ways images served early modern science, from anatomical atlases and botanical illustrations to telescopic and microscopic observations.

 
Man on a pole repairing telegraph
Lecture
United by Lightning: The Transcontinental Telegraph of 1861
Oct. 2, 2019

Edmund Russell, professor of history at Carnegie Mellon University and the Dibner Distinguished Fellow at The Huntington, discusses the motives, construction, and consequences of the completion of transcontinental telegraph in 1861.

 
Open gate of a Chinese Garden
Lecture
Gardens as Ecological Theater: An 18th-Century Story
Sep. 26, 2019

Eugene Wang, professor of art history at Harvard University, discusses the Qianlong Garden in the northeast corner of the Forbidden City. Built in the 1770s, the whole garden space can be seen as a five-act play.

 
Old photograph of workhouse
Lecture
Slavery Matters
Sep. 25, 2019

James Walvin, professor emeritus at the University of York and the Los Angeles Times Distinguished Fellow at The Huntington, discusses the widespread global ramifications of African slavery that transformed the cultural habits of millions of people.