Previously awarded fellowships:   2017–18   |   2016–17   |   2015–16   |   2014–15   |   2013–14

2018–19 Awarded Fellowships

Long-Term Awards

Louis Warren, Professor, University of California, DavisR. STANTON AVERY DISTINGUISHED FELLOW

Louis S. Warren, Professor, University of California, Davis

Topic: Rachel Carson: Sex and Nature

Louis S. Warren is W. Turrentine Jackson Professor of Western U.S. History at the University of California, Davis, where he teaches the history of the American West, California history, environmental history, and U.S. history. His most recent book, God’s Red Son: The Ghost Dance Religion and the Making of Modern America (Basic, 2017) received the Bancroft Prize in American History. He is also the author of The Hunter’s Game: Poachers and Conservationists in Twentieth-Century America (Yale, 1997) and Buffalo Bill’s America: William Cody and the Wild West Show (Alfred A. Knopf, 2005), and editor of a textbook, American Environmental History (Blackwell, 2003). From 2009 to 2013, he was founding co-editor and first editor-in-chief of a peer-reviewed, magazine-format, cross-disciplinary quarterly called Boom: A Journal of California, which was honored with a Best New Magazine award in 2011. In addition to the Bancroft Prize, he has received numerous awards for his research and writing, including the Albert Beveridge Award of the American Historical Association, the Caughey Western History Association Prize, the Western Writer’s of America Spur Award, the Great Plains Distinguished Book Prize, the National Cowboy Hall of Fame Wrangler Award for Best Non-Fiction Book, and a Guggenheim Fellowship. In 2017, he received the Spirit of the American West Award from the Buffalo Bill Center of the West in Cody, Wyoming.


Naomi Tadmor, Professor, Lancaster UniversityFLETCHER JONES FOUNDATION DISTINGUISHED FELLOW

Naomi Tadmor, Professor, Lancaster University

Topic: Cultures of Settlement: Law, Society, and State Formation in England, c.1660-1780

Naomi Tadmor completed her BA and MA at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and was awarded the Foreign and Commonwealth Office Award and the Pembroke College Research Studentship to study for a PhD at the University of Cambridge. She held a Research Fellowship at Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge, and taught at the universities of Cambridge and Sussex. In 2009, she was appointed to a Chair in History at the University of Lancaster. Tadmor specializes in English social history from the sixteenth to the eighteenth centuries and has written widely on the history of reading, the history of kinship and family relationships, and on religion and literature. Her main publications include: The Practice and Representation of Reading (coedited, Cambridge, 1996); Family and Friends in Eighteenth-century England: Household, Kinship and Patronage (Cambridge, 2001); and The Social Universe of the English Bible: Scripture, Society and Culture in Early Modern England (Cambridge, 2010). In 2015/16, she held a British Academy and Leverhulme Trust Senior Research Fellowship to develop a project on poverty and migration in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century England, which she will be completing during her time at The Huntington Library. She will be studying the welfare legislation of the period, and its wide-ranging ramifications and effects.


Martha A. Sandweiss, Professor, Princeton UniversityLOS ANGELES TIMES DISTINGUISHED FELLOW

Martha A. Sandweiss, Professor, Princeton University

Topic: Writing History with a Photograph: Alexander Gardner, Ft. Laramie, and the Colliding Stories of American Life

Martha A. Sandweiss, Professor of History at Princeton University, is a historian of the United States, with interests in the history of the American West, visual culture, and public history. She received her Ph.D. in History from Yale University and began her career as a photography curator at the Amon Carter Museum in Ft. Worth, TX. She later taught American Studies and History at Amherst College for twenty years before joining the Princeton faculty in 2009. Sandweiss is the author or editor of numerous books on American history and photography. Her publications include Passing Strange: A Gilded Age Tale of Love and Deception across the Color Line (2009), a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize in History and the National Book Critics Circle Award in Biography, and Print the Legend: Photography and the American West (2002), winner of the Organization of American Historians’ Ray Allen Billington Award. Her other works include Laura Gilpin: An Enduring Grace (1986), the co-edited volume The Oxford History of the American West (1994), and the edited volume Photography in Nineteenth-Century America (1991). She currently serves as Project Director for the recently launched Princeton & Slavery Project. At The Huntington, Sandweiss is working on a book about the many colliding stories embedded in an Alexander Gardner photograph made at Ft. Laramie in 1868.


Gregory Nobles, Professor Emeritus, Georgia Institute of TechnologyROBERT C. RITCHIE DISTINGUISHED FELLOW

Gregory Nobles, Professor Emeritus, Georgia Institute of Technology

Topic: Noticing Nature: The American People and the Pursuit of Science, 1790-1860

Gregory Nobles is Professor Emeritus of history at Georgia Tech, where he specialized in early American history and environmental history. In addition to teaching, he served in three administrative positions at Georgia Tech, as Associate Dean of the Ivan Allen College (1994-1996), Chair of the School of History, Technology, and Society (1996-2001), and Founding Director of the Georgia Tech Honors Program (2005-2014). He held two Fulbright professorships, as Senior Scholar in New Zealand (1995) and as the John Adams Chair in American History in The Netherlands (2002). His research grants include three from the National Endowment for the Humanities and residential fellowships at the Charles Warren Center at Harvard University, the American Antiquarian Society, The Huntington Library, the Princeton University Library, and the Newberry Library. In 2004 he was named to the Distinguished Lectureship Program of the Organization of American Historians and, for 2005-2008, was elected to the Advisory Council of the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic (SHEAR); more recently, he has also served SHEAR as a member of the Editorial Board of the Journal of the Early Republic and as a member of the SHEAR Book Prize committee. After retiring from Georgia Tech, Nobles was the 2016-2017 Mellon Distinguished Scholar in Residence at the American Antiquarian Society, and his latest book, John James Audubon: The Nature of the American Woodsman, was published by the University of Pennsylvania Press in 2017.


Gary Gallagher, Professor Emeritus, University of VirginiaROGERS DISTINGUISHED FELLOW IN 19th-CENTURY AMERICAN HISTORY

Gary Gallagher, Professor Emeritus, University of Virginia

Topic: Our Civil War: How Scholars and the Public Understand the Great American Crisis

Gary W. Gallagher is the John L. Nau III Professor in the History of the American Civil War Emeritus at the University of Virginia. A native of Los Angeles, he received his graduate training at the University of Texas at Austin. His books include The Confederate War (Harvard University Press, 1997), Lee and His Generals in War and Memory (Louisiana State University Press, 1998), Causes Won, Lost, and Forgotten: How Hollywood and Popular Art Shape What We Know About the Civil War (University of North Carolina Press, 2008), The Union War (Harvard University Press, 2011), Becoming Confederates: Paths to a New National Loyalty (University of Georgia Press, 2013), and The American War: A History of the Civil War Era (co-authored with Joan Waugh, Spielvogel Books, 2015). Active in the field of historic preservation, he served twice on the board of the Civil War Trust. At The Huntington, he will work on a book-length project prospectively titled “Our Civil War: How Scholars and the Public Understand the Great American Crisis.”


Alexander Statman, Fellow, Global Intellectual History Graduate School, Freie Universität Berlin and Humboldt-Universität zu BerlinDIBNER RESEARCH FELLOWS IN THE HISTORY OF SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY

Alexander Statman, Fellow, Global Intellectual History Graduate School, Freie Universität Berlin and Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin

Topic: China Enchanted: Transformations of Knowledge in the Enlightenment World

Alexander Statman is a postdoctoral fellow in the Global Intellectual History Graduate School, Freie Universität and Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin. He received his B.A. from Columbia University and his Ph.D. in history from Stanford University. His research on the global Enlightenment and east-west exchange in the history of science has been published in journals such as Isis: A Journal of the History of Science Society and East Asian Science, Technology, and Medicine. At The Huntington Library, he is completing his first book, Global Enlightenment: France, China, and the Idea of Progress, which argues that a signature contribution of what has been thought of as the European Enlightenment – the idea of progress – emerged through a global conversation between France and China.


Rachel St John, Associate Professor, University of California, DavisDANA AND DAVID DORNSIFE FELLOW

Rachel St John, Associate Professor, University of California, Davis

Topic: The Imagined States of America: The Unmanifest History of Nineteenth-century North America

Rachel St John is Associate Professor in the Department of History at UC Davis. Her research focuses on North American history with a particular emphasis on state-formation and nation-building in the nineteenth century. Her first book, Line in the Sand: A History of the Western U.S.-Mexico Border, was published by Princeton University Press in early 2011. Her current book project, The Imagined States of America: The Unmanifest History of Nineteenth-century North America, explores the diverse range of nation-building projects that emerged across the continent in the 19th century. Originally from California, she taught at New York University and Harvard University before joining the faculty at UC Davis in 2016.


Lori Anne Ferrell, Professor, Claremont Graduate UniversityDANA AND DAVID DORNSIFE FELLOW

Lori Anne Ferrell, Professor, Claremont Graduate University

Topic: The Modern Invention of the Historical Reformation

Lori Anne Ferrell (a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society) is the John D. and Lillian Maguire Distinguished Professor in the Humanities at Claremont Graduate University, with a joint appointment in early modern history and literature. She is also the director of The Kingsley & Kate Tufts Annual Poetry Awards at CGU. Her many multidisciplinary publications have concentrated on the effect of religious and political change on early modern texts—theological, literary, theatrical, and practical—in the turbulent century before the outbreak of civil war in Britain. Prof. Ferrell is the author of Government by Polemic and The Bible and the People, as well as the editor of the forthcoming The Oxford Edition of the Sermons of John Donne: Sermons at St Paul’s Cathedral, 1623-5. She has held residential fellowships at The Huntington Library; the Folger Shakespeare Library, Washington, DC; the Newberry Library, Chicago, IL; All Souls College Oxford. UK; Wolfson College Cambridge, UK; Pembroke College Cambridge, UK; and the Bogliasco Foundation Study Centre in Liguria, Italy; and fellowships from the US-UK Fulbright Commission and the Whiting Foundation.


Katherine Adams, Associate Professor, Tulane UniversityMELLON FELLOW

Katherine Adams, Associate Professor, Tulane University

Topic: Reconstructing Value: Cotton Culture and Blackness after Emancipation

Katherine Adams is an associate professor of English and Kimmerling Chair in Women’s Literature at Tulane University. She is the author of Owning Up: Privacy, Property, and Belonging in US Women’s Life Writing (Oxford 2009) and of essays on gender and race politics in nineteenth-century US literature and culture. She guest edited “US Women Writing Race,” a 2009 special issue of Tulsa Studies in Women’s Literature, and co-edited, with Sandy Zagarell and Caroline Gebhard, a 2016 special issue of Legacy dedicated to the life, writing, and activism of Alice Dunbar-Nelson. At The Huntington she will be completing her second book project, Reconstructing Value: Cotton Culture and Blackness after Emancipation, an examination of how black writers reimagined racial capitalism in the decades following the abolition of slavery.


Kristen Block, Associate Professor, University of Tennessee, KnoxvilleMOLINA FELLOW IN THE HISTORY OF MEDICINE & ALLIED SCIENCES

Kristen Block, Associate Professor, University of Tennessee, Knoxville

Topic: Holistic Medicine, Spiritual Healing, and Dis-ease in the Early Caribbean

Kristen Block is Associate Professor of History and the Program Director of Latin American and Caribbean Studies at the University of Tennessee. Her research has focused geographically on the Caribbean–arguably the epicenter of colonial competition in the early modern Americas. Her second book project, Holistic Medicine, Spiritual Healing, and Disease in the Early Caribbean, explores how residents of the region defined disease and contagion--and how conflict and hybridity influenced their attempts at healing. Today’s rising interest in holistic medicine from both Western scientific establishments and a range of spiritual communities brings to mind what was once commonly accepted by all people--that a person’s mind, body, and spirit are inextricably linked. She intends to study those links without privileging science over religion, learned over “folk” therapies. As in her first book, Ordinary Lives in the Early Caribbean: Religion, Colonial Competition and the Politics of Profit (UGA Press, 2012), she meditates on the limits of conventional historical methods to capture the emotions and voices of her subjects, many of them marginalized because of their sex, class, or enslaved status. She also remains committed to understanding the multilingual and inter-imperial entanglements that marked life in the early circum-Caribbean, and utilizes primary sources in Spanish, French, and English in her research.


Seth LeJacq, Fellow, Duke UniversityMOLINA FELLOW IN THE HISTORY OF MEDICINE & ALLIED SCIENCES

Seth LeJacq, Fellow, Duke University

Topic: Knowing Sexual Crime

Seth Stein LeJacq is a Lecturing Fellow in Duke University's Thompson Writing Program. He received his BA from Cornell University and his Ph.D. in 2016 from the Department of the History of Medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He is currently completing work on his first book project, Run Afoul: Sodomy, Masculinity, and the Body in the Sailing Royal Navy. This work explores masculinity and sexuality among British sailors in the age of sail, and focuses on the history of trials for same-sexual contact in the fleet from the late seventeenth century into the Victorian era. At The Huntington, his research will investigate forensic medicine and sexual crime in the premodern west, asking how knowledge of proscribed sexual activities was generated, how it circulated, and how it was used.


Katherine Cox, Lecturer, University of Texas, AustinNATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES FELLOW

Katherine Cox, Lecturer, University of Texas, Austin

Topic: Climate Change and Original Sin: Meteorology and Acoustics in the Age of Milton

Katherine Cox recently received her Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Austin and holds a B.A. from Stanford University. She taught English literature in post-doctoral positions at UT Austin from 2016-2018. Her scholarship focuses on the intersections between British Renaissance literature, the history of science, and the history of environment, and appears in article form in SEL: Studies in English Literature and Milton Studies. Her recent essay on the acoustical mechanism of temptation depicted in Paradise Lost received the Milton Society of America’s James Holly Hanford Article Award. As a 2018-2019 NEH Fellow, she will spend a year at The Huntington Library working on her book manuscript, Climate Change and Original Sin: Meteorology and Acoustics in the Age of Milton. The project demonstrates the influence of the early modern fields of meteorology and acoustics in Milton’s moralistic portrayal of climate corruption and brings to light the theological inflections of early modern climatology.


Marjoleine Kars, Associate Professor, University of Maryland, Baltimore CountyNATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES FELLOW

Marjoleine Kars, Associate Professor, University of Maryland, Baltimore County

Topic: Slaves Remastered: An Untold Story of Rebellion, Revolution, and Restoration in the Atlantic World

Marjoleine Kars is Associate Professor of History at UMBC where she just served two terms as department chair. At The Huntington she will be finishing a book about a massive and nearly successful slave rebellion in a Dutch colony (now the Republic of Guyana) in South America tentatively titled Slaves Remastered: An Untold Story of Rebellion, Revolution, and Restoration in the Atlantic World. An article about this work, “Dodging Rebellion: Politics and Gender in the Berbice Slave Uprising of 1763,” published in the American Historical Review (2016) won a number of prizes. With Michael McDonnell and Andrew Schocket, she is editing a three-volume Handbook of the American Revolution for Cambridge University Press.


Manuel Covo, Assistant Professor, University of California, Santa BarbaraNATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES FELLOW

Manuel Covo, Assistant Professor, University of California, Santa Barbara

Topic: The Entrepôt of Atlantic Revolutions: The Colony of Saint Domingue, Commercial Republicanism, and the Remaking of the French Empire

Manuel Covo is an assistant professor of history at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He received his Ph.D. from the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales in Paris. Prior to joining he was a postdoctoral fellow in the Program in Early American Economy and Society at the Library Company in Philadelphia and served as an assistant professor at the University of Warwick in the United Kingdom. He is completing his first book project entitled The Entrepôt of Atlantic Revolutions: Saint-Domingue, Commercial Republicanism and the Remaking of the French Empire (1778-1804). It places the American, the French, and the Haitian Revolution in a global context and argues that the massive trade between the wealthiest slave colony in the world and the first independent republic in the Americas was foundational in the invention of a modern French republican empire.


Jessica Rosenberg, Assistant Professor, University of MiamiBARBARA THOM POSTDOCTORAL FELLOW

Jessica Rosenberg, Assistant Professor, University of Miami

Topic: Botanical Virtues: Horticulture and Textual Culture in Early Modern England

Jessica Rosenberg is Assistant Professor of English at the University of Miami, where she teaches courses on Shakespeare, early modern literature and culture, and science and literature. Drawing on the history of the book and the history of science, her research examines the formative connections between poetry, print, and the natural world in early modern England. Her current project, Botanical Virtues: Horticulture and Textual Culture in Early Modern England, traces the plants, flowers, and trees ubiquitous in the poetic and practical books published in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century England. She has also essays published or forthcoming on husbandry, poetry, and household management; the virtues of plants; and the poetics of instructional books.


Danielle Terrazas Williams, Assistant Professor, Oberlin CollegeBARBARA THOM POSTDOCTORAL FELLOW

Danielle Terrazas Williams, Assistant Professor, Oberlin College

Topic: The Capital of Free Women: Race, Status, and Economic Networks in Colonial Veracruz

Danielle Terrazas Williams (Ph.D. Duke University) is Assistant Professor of History at Oberlin College. Her work focuses on the social and legal histories of African-descended people in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Mexico. Her research interests include women’s history, governance, slavery, family, and notions of class and status. Her work has appeared in The Americas and Ulúa. Her current book project aims to challenge traditional narratives of racial hierarchies and gendered mobility by focusing on African-descended women’s experiences in Mexico’s understudied period of 1580-1730. At The Huntington, she will be working with the collection’s rare books and manuscripts to study the regional influence of various Catholic institutions and to examine the impact of Caribbean piracy on both quotidian experiences and colonial governance.


Daniela Bleichmar, Associate Professor, University of Southern CaliforniaACLS/BURKHARDT FELLOW

Daniela Bleichmar, Associate Professor, University of Southern California

Topic: The Itinerant Lives of Painted Books: Mexican Codices and Transatlantic Knowledge in the Early Modern World

Daniela Bleichmar is Associate Professor of Art History and History at the University of Southern California, where she also serves as Associate Provost for Faculty and Student Initiatives in the Arts and Humanities. She received a BA from Harvard University and a PhD in the history of science from Princeton University. She is the author of Visible Empire: Botanical Expeditions and Visual Culture in the Hispanic Enlightenment (University of Chicago Press, 2012) and Visual Voyages: Images of Latin American Nature from Columbus to Darwin (Yale University Press, 2017). The latter publication accompanied an exhibition by the same name that she co-curated at The Huntington in Fall 2017 as part of the Getty Foundation’s initiative Pacific Standard Time: Los Angeles/Latin America. Other publications include the co-edited books Objects in Motion in the Early Modern World (2015), Collecting Across Cultures: Material Exchanges in the Early Modern Atlantic World (2011), and Science in the Spanish and Portuguese Empires, 1500–1800 (2009). Her research and teaching address the history of science, visual culture, and material culture in colonial Latin America and early modern Europe, focusing particularly on knowledge production, cultural contact and exchange, collecting, and the history of the book. Her current book project is entitled Painted Book: A Mexican Codex on the Move in the Early Modern World.


Andrea Denny-Brown, Associate Professor, University of California, RiversideACLS/BURKHARDT FELLOW

Andrea Denny-Brown, Associate Professor, University of California, Riverside

Topic: Criminal Ornament: Aesthetic Misbehavior in the Fifteenth Century

Andrea Denny-Brown is Associate Professor of English at the University of California, Riverside. She is the author of Fashioning Change: The Trope of Clothing in High- and Late-Medieval England (2012) and the co-editor, with Lisa H. Cooper, of Lydgate Matters: Poetry and Material Culture in the Fifteenth Century (2008) and The Arma Christi in Medieval and Early Modern Material Culture (2014). Most recently she has guest-edited a double issue of the journal Exemplaria on “The Provocative Fifteenth Century,” a project that originated as a conference at the Huntington Library in 2015. Her current book project, Criminal Ornament: Aesthetic Misbehavior in the Fifteenth Century, claims a new importance for the aesthetic category of medieval ornament in Western intellectual history. This project demonstrates the emergence of ornament as a provocative interdisciplinary technique in late medieval verbal, visual, and decorative arts that also played a crucial if antithetical role in the articulation of modernist aesthetics in the early twentieth century.


Michael Vorenberg, Associate Professor, Brown UniversityOCCIDENTAL/BILLINGTON VISITING PROFESSOR IN U.S. HISTORY

Michael Vorenberg, Associate Professor, Brown University

Topic: Lincoln’s Peace: Struggling to Find the End of the American Civil War

Michael Vorenberg is Associate Professor of History at Brown University. His work focuses on the American Civil War, the U.S. Constitution, slave emancipation, and citizenship. He is the author of Final Freedom: The Civil War, the Abolition of Slavery, and the Thirteenth Amendment (Cambridge University Press, 2001), which was a finalist for the Lincoln Prize and was used liberally by Stephen Spielberg for his 2012 film Lincoln. He is also the author of an edited collection, The Emancipation Proclamation: A Brief History with Documents (Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2010). Currently he is completing a book to be published by Alfred A. Knopf titled Lincoln’s Peace, about the struggle to end the American Civil War. He is the recipient of fellowships from the American Council of Learned Societies and the National Endowment for the Humanities. At Brown, he has received the McLoughlin Prize for teaching and the Romer Prize for advising. From 2004 to 2007, he was a member of Brown’s steering committee on slavery and justice.


Gabriel Motzkin, Professor Emeritus, Hebrew University of JerusalemELEANOR SEARLE VISITING PROFESSOR IN THE HISTORY AT CALTECH AND THE HUNTINGTON

Gabriel Motzkin, Professor Emeritus, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Topic: The Emotional Basis for Scientific Activity

Gabriel Motzkin was the Director of the Van Leer Jerusalem Institute from 2007 to 2016 and Dean of the Faculty of Humanities at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem from 2001 to 2004. He held the Ahad Ha’am Chair in Philosophy, and was also a member of the departments of History and German Literature. He has been a Fellow at the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science, the Carl Friedrich von Siemens Foundation, Clare Hall at the University of Cambridge, and the Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin. He has been a Visiting Professor at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales (Paris), and at the universities of Giessen, Amsterdam, and Konstanz. His fields of interest are: the philosophy of history, secularization theory, and historical conceptions of memory. His current research is about the preconditions for the development in literature and in religion of a conception of subjectivity that makes science possible. In this vein, he is studying the troubadours and late medieval mysticism.

Short-Term Awards

Myles Ali, Doctoral Candidate, York University
"Here in the Queen's Territory, Every Man and Woman is Free": Slavery and the Lives of the Enslaved in Colonial Sierra Leone, 1834-1896
One month

Anne Anderson, Associate Professor, Victoria and Albert Museum
Chelsea Mania: The Huntington Chelsea Porcelain
Two month

Benny Andrés, Associate Professor, University of North Carolina, Charlotte
La Compania de Terrenos y Aguas de la Baja California, S.A.: An Environmental Enterprise Shaping the Lower Colorado River Region, 1900-1962
One month

Richard Ansell, Fellow, University of Leicester
Reading Travels: The Afterlives of European Voyages, 1600-1750
Three months

Claire Arcenas, Assistant Professor, University of Montana
Lockean Legacies: John Locke in American Thought and Culture
One month

Lucy Arnold, Lecturer, University of Leeds
Reading Hilary Mantel: Haunted Decades
One month

Elaine Ayers, Doctoral Candidate, Princeton University
Strange Beauty: Botanical Collection, Preservation, and Display in the Nineteenth-Century Tropics
Two months

Anthony Bale, Professor, Birkbeck College, University of London
Late Medieval Pilgrims' Books
One month

Kristen Beales, Doctoral Candidate, College of William and Mary
Thy Will Be Done: Merchant Religion in America, 1720-1815
One month

Jessica Beckman, Doctoral Candidate, Stanford University
Moveable Types: Shaping the Text in Early Modern England
Three months

Emily Bell, Doctoral Candidate, University of York
Theorizing the Literary Circle: Charles Dickens, James T. Fields, and Spheres of Influence
One month

Leah Benedict, Lecturer, Washington State University
Impotence: The Anatomy of a Passion, 1660-1800
Three months

David Brown, Adjunct Faculty, Trinity College Dublin
Speculators in Conflict: The Adventurers for Irish Land 1642-1660
One month

Scottie Buehler, Doctoral Candidate, University of California, Los Angeles
Being and Becoming a Midwife in Eighteenth-Century France: Pedagogical Practices and Objects
Two months

Claire Cage, Assistant Professor, University of South Alabama
The Science of Proof: Forensic Medicine in Nineteenth-Century France
One month

Richard Carwardine, Professor, University of Oxford
American Religious Nationalism
Two months

Joseph Clark, Assistant Professor, University of Kentucky
Veracruz and the Caribbean in the Seventeenth Century
One month

Sasha Coles, Doctoral Candidate, University of California, Santa Barbara
Silk Country: Women, Work, and Enterprise in the Great Basin, 1850-1910s
One month

Jason Crawford, Associate Professor, Union University
Shakespearean Tragedy: A Genealogical Poetics
One month

Kathryn Crim, Doctoral Candidate, University of California, Berkeley
Prayers, Interrupted
One month

Jessica Dandona, Associate Professor, Minneapolis College of Art and Design
The Transparent Woman: Medical Visualities in Fin-de-Siècle Europe and the United States, 1890-1900
One month

Gregory Dart, Professor, University College London
Works of Charles Lamb
Three months

Matthew Day, Doctoral Candidate, University of Oxford
Reception of Virgil in England and Scotland 1400-1550
One month

Adhaar Noor Desai, Assistant Professor, Bard College
Blotted Lines: Imperfection and Early Modern English Literature
Three months

Bridget Donnelly, Doctoral Candidate, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Accidents Waiting to Happen: Plotting the Unexpected in the Eighteenth-Century Novel
One month

John Donoghue, Associate Professor, Loyola University of Chicago
"Creative Destruction": Piracy, Marronage, and Plantation Capitalism in the British Caribbean, 1650-1700
One month

Susan Doran, Professor, University of Oxford
Regime Changes: From Elizabeth I to James I 1603-12
One month

Marshall Eakin, Professor, Vanderbilt University
Richard Burton, Empire, and Nation in Nineteenth-Century Brazil
One month

Elizabeth Ellis, Assistant Professor, New York University
Power on the Margins: The Petites Nations and the Transformations of the Lower Mississippi Valley 1650-1800
One month

Molly Farrell, Associate Professor, Ohio State University
New World Calculation: The Making of Numbers in Colonial America
Two months

Kathryn Franklin, Doctoral Candidate, York University
"Something of the Glamour": Tracing the Geographies of Glamour in the Work of Christopher Isherwood
One month

James Freeman, Curator, Cambridge University Library
The Past and its Presentation in the "Polychronicon" of Ranulph Higden
One month

Gabriella Friedman, Doctoral Candidate, Cornell University
Anatomy and Archive: Octavia E. Butler as Historical Thinker
One month

Elizabeth Gansen, Assistant Professor, Grand Valley State University
Illustrating the New World: Gonzalo Fernández de Oviedo's Sketches of Flora and Fauna
One month

John Garcia, Assistant Professor, California State University, Northridge
The Early American Bookseller: A Network History
One month

Penelope Geng, Assistant Professor, Macalester College
Communal Justice in Shakespeare's England
Two months

Kate Gibson, Doctoral Candidate, University of Sheffield
Grief and the Family in Britain, 1750-1830
One month

Sarah Gleeson-White, Associate Professor, University of Sydney
First Encounters: American Literary and Screen Cultures, 1895-1927
One month

Carolin Görgen, Doctoral Candidate, Paris Diderot University
The California Camera Club, 1890-1915: Re-Appreciation of a Neglected Corpus in the History of Photography
One month

Charles Green, Doctoral Candidate, University of Birmingham
Authorship and Agency in John Donne's Commemorative Writing
Three months

Jennifer Greenhill, Associate Professor, University of Southern California
The Commercial Imagination: American Illustration and the Advent of the Pictorial Advertising Age
One month

Eric Griffin, Professor, Millsaps College
England's Jacobean Dramatists and the Geopolitics of Empire: Hispanophobic Hispanophiles
One month

Alison Griffiths, Professor, Baruch College, CUNY
Nomadic Cinema: A Cultural Geography of the Expedition Film
Three months

Ashley Hannebrink, Doctoral Candidate, Harvard University
Living with the Past: Antiquity and Sculptural Production in Mid- to Late Eighteenth-Century France
One month

Hunter Harris, Doctoral Candidate, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
When Trust Fails: Merchants, Law, and Empire in the Eighteenth Century
One month

Earle Havens, Associate Professor, Johns Hopkins University
Reconstructing Narcissus Luttrell's Library of Annotated Books and Ephemera, 1678-1730
One month

Philippa Hellawell, Fellow, National Maritime Museum, Royal Museums Greenwich
Engineering the Mole: Tangier, 1663-1684
Two months

Kathleen Hilliard, Associate Professor, Iowa State University
Bonds Burst Asunder: The Revolutionary Politics of Getting By in Civil War and Emancipation, 1860-1867
Two months

Catherine Hinchliff, Doctoral Candidate, Johns Hopkins University
Women, Gender, and Speech in the English Revolution
One month

Nathaniel Holly, Doctoral Candidate, College of William and Mary
From Chota to Charles Town: The Urban Lives of Cherokees
One month

Lynn Hudson, Associate Professor, University of Illinois, Chicago
Loren Miller and the Case against Jim Crow
Two months

Luca Iori, Fellow, University of Parma
Thomas Hobbes's Translation of Thucydides: Toward a Critical Edition
Two months

Rachael Isom, Doctoral Candidate, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Enthusiastic Poetics and the Woman Writer, 1806-1856
One month

Benjamin Jackson, Doctoral Candidate, Queen Mary University of London
Furnishing Masculinity: Men's Material Culture in Eighteenth-Century England
One month

Kevin James, Professor, University of Guelph
Science, Leisure, and the "Fairyland of Lights": Technology and Tourism in the San Gabriel Mountains at the Turn of the Century
One month

J.T. Jamieson, Doctoral Candidate, University of California, Berkeley
Advertising Uncertainty: Geographical Writing, Western Emigration, and Disbelief in Nineteenth-Century America
One month

Peter Jaros, Associate Professor, Franklin and Marshall College
Incorporate Things: A Literary Genealogy of Corporate Personhood in Antebellum America
One month

Emma Bennett Jones, Doctoral Candidate, Northwestern University
"The Indians Say": Settler Colonialism and the Scientific Study of Animals in America, 1722 to 1860
One month

Michaela Kleber, Doctoral Candidate, College of William and Mary
Gendered Societies, Sexual Empires: Early French Colonization among the Illinois
One month

Joseph Larnerd, Doctoral Candidate, Stanford University
The Makings of Cut Glass in America, 1876 to 1916
One month

Mary Learner, Doctoral Candidate, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Material Sampling and Patterns of Thought in Early Modern England
Two months

Diana Leca, Fellow, University of Oxford
Wallace Stevens' Aphoristic Style
Two months

Julia Lee, Associate Professor, University of California, Irvine
The Racial Railroad
Two months

Nigel Lepianka, Doctoral Candidate, Texas A&M University
"Yet of Books There Are a Plenty": Bibliography and Humanities Data
One month

Timothy Lundy, Doctoral Candidate, Columbia University
Political Learning and Sidneian Drama in Early Modern English Literary Culture
One month

Graeme Mack, Doctoral Candidate, University of California, San Diego
Sea Changes upon the Land: Pacific Merchants and the Transformation of California, 1787-1853
Four months

Justin Mann, Doctoral Candidate, George Washington University
Dangerous Worlds: Imagining Race and Security after the New World Order
One month

Caroline Marris, Doctoral Candidate, Columbia University
"The Silver Sea" and the Nation-State: The Multifaceted Geopolitics of the Early Modern English Channel
One month

Kristen McCants, Doctoral Candidate, University of California, Santa Barbara
Beastly Humans: Margaret Cavendish's "Blazing World," Natural Philosophy, and Romantic Governance
One month

Eric McDonald, Doctoral Candidate, University of Houston
Violent Identities: Elite Masculinity and Anglo-American Slavery in Seventeenth-Century Barbados
Two months

Patrick McGhee, Doctoral Candidate, University of Cambridge
"Heathenism" in the Protestant Atlantic World
Three months

Timo McGregor, Doctoral Candidate, New York University
Vernacular Visions of Empire: Cross-Imperial Collaboration and Political Thought in the Dutch Atlantic, 1645-1688
One month

Karen Melvin, Professor, Bates College
Local Alms, Global Catholicism: Jerusalem and North Africa in New Spain
One month

Lynn S. Meskill, Associate Professor, Paris Diderot University
Fortune in Shakespeare
Two months

Amy Milka, Fellow, University of Adelaide
Women Seeking Justice: Gender, Emotion, and Courtroom Narratives in England, 1700-1850
Three months

Fiona Milne, Doctoral Candidate, University of York
Character, Self-Defense, and Moral Improvement in the Writings of Richard Carlile and Eliza Sharples
One month

Philip Mogen, Doctoral Candidate, University of Pennsylvania
Unstable Histories, Uncertain Presents: Rethinking the Past and Recognizing the Present during the British Civil Wars, 1638-1660
One month

Duncan Money, Fellow, University of the Free State
American Mining Engineers and the Development of the Global Mining Industry, c. 1860-1939
One month

James Morland, Doctoral Candidate, King's College London
Eighteenth-Century Physicians as Poets and Philosophers
Two months

Lucy Morse, Doctoral Candidate, University of Exeter
The Radical Dispossessed: Imaginative Rebellions against the Theft of Common Environments 1864-1893
Two months

John Murphy, Curator, Art Institute of Chicago
American Arts and Crafts: An Ecocritical Approach
Two months

Katie Muth, Fellow, Durham University
Day Jobs: Postwar Fiction and Work
One month

Leslie Myrick, Independent scholar
A Prosopography of the Plains: California-Oregon Trail Emigration Patterns and Social Networks in 1849
Two months

Kate Nesbit, Doctoral Candidate, University of Iowa
Lending Ears: Listening to Reading Aloud in the Nineteenth-Century British Novel
One month

Michael Nicholson, Assistant Professor, McGill University
After Time: Romanticism and Anachronism
Four months

Jason Peacey, Professor, University College London
Experiences of Litigation, Perceptions of the Law and Ideology in a Seventeenth-Century Microhistory
One month

Jackson Perry, Doctoral Candidate, Georgetown University
The Gospel of the Gum: Eucalyptus and the Modern Mediterranean World, 1848-1896
Two months

Jenny Hale Pulsipher, Associate Professor, Brigham Young University
Shadow Sacagawea: A Family Story of Race and Religion in the American West
Four months

Nic John Ramos, Assistant Professor, Brown University
Representing Health: Medical Governance and Education in the Age of Multiculturalism
Two months

Robin Reich, Doctoral Candidate, Columbia University
Copper-alloys and Cures: A History of Scientific Translation in Norman Sicily
Two months

Julia Reid, Lecturer, University of Leeds
Robert Louis Stevenson's The Silverado Squatters: A New Critical Edition
One month

Sean Richardson, Doctoral Candidate, Nottingham Trent University
Queer Cartographies: Mapping Modernist Sexuality 1905-1945
One month

Jonathan Schroeder, Assistant Professor, University of Warwick
John Jacobs: A Life
One month

Jaclyn Schultz, Doctoral Candidate, University of California, Santa Cruz
Learning the Values of a Dollar: Childhood and Cultures of Economy in the US, 1825-1900
Two months

Benjamin Serby, Doctoral Candidate, Columbia University
The Liberation of America: Adventures of a Concept, 1945-1980
One month

Andrew Shaler, Doctoral Candidate, University of California, Riverside
Mariposa: Violence, Settler Colonialism, and Indigenous Histories of the California Gold Rush
One month

JB Shank, Professor, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities
Evangelista Torricelli: A Baroque Life
Two months

Manuel Shvartzberg Carrio, Doctoral Candidate, Columbia University
Designing "Post-Industrial Society": Settler Colonialism and Modern Architecture in Palm Springs, California, 1876-1973
Two months

Eleanor Skimin, Doctoral Candidate, Brown University
Bourgeois Whiteness and the Sedentary Act: Seatedness in Modern Theatre and Performance
One month

Andrew Spicer, Professor, Oxford Brookes University
Post-Reformation Rites of Consecration
One month

Lieke Stelling, Assistant Professor, Utrecht University
Faith in Jestbooks: Joking about Religion in Early Modern English Jest Collections
Three months

Emery Stephens, Assistant Professor, University of Arkansas, Little Rock
The New Negro Movement and Its Influence on the Art Song Compositions for Voice and Piano by Harold Bruce Forsythe (1908-1976)
One month

Fleur Stolker, Doctoral Candidate, University of Oxford
Bankruptcy in Early Modern England
Two months

Joel Swann, Researcher in Residence, Chetham's Library
Early Annotators of The Temple (1633)
One month

Elizabeth Tavares, Assistant Professor, Pacific University
With Amozins, Heads, and Drom: The Dramaturgy of "Tamar Cam"
One month

Samantha Thompson, Doctoral Candidate, Arizona State University
Electronic Eyes: The Carnegie Institution of Washington's Effort to Develop and Promote Two-dimensional Electronic Detectors for Astronomy
Three months

William Thompson, Doctoral Candidate, University of California, Santa Barbara
Iconoclasm, Iconophilia, and the Negotiation of Religious Change in Tudor East Anglia, 1530–1553
One month

Anna Toledano, Doctoral Candidate, Stanford University
Collecting Independence: The Science and Politics of Natural History Museums in New Spain, 1770-1820
Two months

Ian Tonat, Doctoral Candidate, College of William and Mary
The People of the Bay: Native Society and Identity in the Green Bay Region in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries
One month

Catherine Tourangeau, Doctoral Candidate, Yale University
An Empire of Joiners: Voluntary Associations in the British Atlantic, 1730-1800
One month

Viet Trinh, Doctoral Candidate, Yale University
Burning All Illusions: Race and Rebellion in the City of Angels, 1965-1992
One month

Steven Usselman, Professor, Georgia Institute of Technology
From Wells to Warships: Pumps and the Rise of High-Tech California, 1890-1950
Five months

Jan Frans van Dijkhuizen, Associate Professor, University of Leiden
Consolation and the Culture of Protestantism in Early Modern Britain, 1550–1700
One month

Naoko Wake, Associate Professor, Michigan State University
Bombing Americans: Gender and Trans-Pacific Remembering after World War II
Three months

Katherine Walker, Doctoral Candidate, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Reading the Natural and Preternatural Worlds in Early Modern Drama
Two months

Emily Weissbourd, Assistant Professor, Lehigh University
Bad Blood: Race and the Place of Spain in Early Modern English Literature
One month

Charnan Williams, Doctoral Candidate, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
Claiming Property: Enslaving Black Women and Female Children in Antebellum California
Three months

Mark Williams, Lecturer, Cardiff University
"Anxious Cosmopolitans": Mobility and Corporate Culture in the Early British Empire, 1660-1720
One month

Michael Wise, Assistant Professor, University of North Texas
Seeing Like a Stomach: Food, the Body, and Explorers of the American West in the Nineteenth Century
One month

Natale Zappia, Associate Professor, Whittier College
Food Frontiers: Native Space and Power in Early North America
One month

Anna Ziajka Stanton, Assistant Professor, Pennsylvania State University
Labors of Love: Translating Arabic Literature after Orientalism
One month

Alan Jutzi Fellows

Beatrix Gates, Adjunct Faculty, Goddard College
Good Seeing: A Poem of the Full Sky
One month

Travis Hancock, Independent scholar
A critical biography of Nathaniel Bright Emerson
One month

Joint Fellows

Florida Atlantic University
Deborah Charnoff, Doctoral Candidate, Graduate Center, City University of New York
Men Set on Fire: Algernon Sidney & John Adams—Remodeling Anglo-American Republicanism
One month

Hannah Jorgenson, Doctoral Candidate, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities
Models of Consent: Exploring Early Modern Fiction by Women, from Cavendish to Austen
One month

Jordan Wingate, Doctoral Candidate, University of California, Los Angeles
The Periodical Origins of the American Self
One month

North American Conference on British Studies
Catherine Hinchliff, Doctoral Candidate, Johns Hopkins University
Women, Gender, and Speech in the English Revolution
One month

Renaissance Society of America
David Davis, Assistant Professor, Houston Baptist University
Divine Revelation in English Devotion, 1400-1700
One month

Rocky Mountain Modern Language Association
Lauren Connolly, Assistant Professor, Lewis-Clark State College
Octavia Butler and Explorations of the Writing Process
One month

Shakespeare Association of America
Deann Armstrong, Doctoral Candidate, Vanderbilt University
"The Sundred Clock": Temporal and Bodily Disorder in English Renaissance Literature
One month

Western History Association-Martin Ridge
Mette Flynt, Doctoral Candidate, University of Oklahoma
Reborn on Skis: Winter Recreation and the Transformation of the Wasatch Front, 1915-2002
One month

Corpus Christi College Exchange Fellows

From Corpus Christi:
TBD

To Corpus Christi:
Jason Crawford, Associate Professor, Union University
Shakespearean Tragedy: A Genealogical Poetics

Linacre College Exchange Fellows

From Linacre:
Alice Blackwood, Doctoral Candidate, University of Oxford
Female Officeholding in the English Parish, 1540-1660

To Linacre:
Lori Anne Ferrell, Professor, Claremont Graduate University
The Modern Invention of the Historical Reformation

Lincoln College Exchange Fellows

From Lincoln:
Sarah Cusk, Antiquarian Cataloguer, University of Oxford
The Bridgewater Library: Towards the Reconstruction of a Seventeenth-century Collection

To Lincoln:
Jonathan Reinhardt, Doctoral Candidate, Cornell University
Political Secrecy and Theatricality in Marlowe and Shakespeare

New College Exchange Fellows

From New:
Michael Burden, Professor, University of Oxford
Gazing at the Dancer: Dance and Image at the London Opera House, 1780-1830

To New:
Adrian Finucane, Assistant Professor, Florida Atlantic University
Difference, Disunity, and Defense on the Frontier

Trinity College Dublin

From Trinity College Dublin:
Catherine Healy, Doctoral Candidate, Trinity College Dublin
Irish Immigrant Women and the Politics of Domesticity

To Trinity College Dublin:
Sarah Sprouse, Doctoral Candidate, Texas Tech University
Fantasies of Wales: Some Paleographic Evidence for the Mediating Role of Gerald of Wales

Trinity Hall Exchange Fellows

From Trinity Hall:
Oliver Goldstein, Doctoral Candidate, University of Cambridge
Radical Conservative Pre-Raphaelitism

To Trinity Hall:
Lindsay Wells, Doctoral Candidate, University of Wisconsin, Madison
Plant-Based Art: Indoor Gardening and the British Aesthetic Movement, 1860-1900

Travel Grants to the United Kingdom

Lila Chambers, Doctoral Candidate, New York University
Liquid Capital: Alcohol and the Building of Britain's Atlantic Empire, 1640-1751

Bridget Donnelly, Doctoral Candidate, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Accidents Waiting to Happen: Plotting the Unexpected in the Eighteenth-Century Novel

Scott Heerman, Assistant Professor, University of Miami
Carried Back: Black Kidnapping and State Formation in the Age of Atlantic Emancipation

Peter Olsen-Harbich, Doctoral Candidate, College of William and Mary
A Meaningful Subjection: Coercive Inequality and Indigenous Political Economy in the Colonial Northeast

Kirsty Sinclair-Dootson, Doctoral Candidate, Yale University
Industrial Color: Chromatic Technologies in Britain, 1856-1971

Jessica Winston, Professor, Idaho State University
Tudor Drama in Modern Performance, 1890-Present

AHRC-Huntington Fellows

Edward Armston-Sheret, Doctoral Candidate, Royal Holloway, University of London
Bodies of Knowledge: A Study of the Body and Embodiment in Richard Burton's Library and Manuscripts
Three months

Dominic Birch, Doctoral Candidate, King's College London
Legal Pluralism, Colonialism, and the Atlantic Context: A Comparison of English and American Legalism
Three months

Christopher Booth, Doctoral Candidate, University of Nottingham
Distilling the Apothecary: The Archaeology of Early Modern Medical Practitioners in Britain and the Atlantic World
Three months

Eoin Carter, Doctoral Candidate, University of Cambridge
Richard Carlile and the Politics of Science in Early Nineteenth-Century Britain
Four months

Francesca Cioni, Doctoral Candidate, University of York
The Material Culture of Early Modern Devotional Poetry
Three months

Miriam Goodall, Doctoral Candidate, University of Oxford
Sugar and the Country House
Three months

Chloë Ingersent, Doctoral Candidate, University of Oxford
Female Violence in Sixteenth-Century England
Three months

Tom Lubek, Doctoral Candidate, University of York
Investigating World-Literary Resources, Petro-Fantasies, and World-Ecological Transitions in the Fiction of Octavia E. Butler
Four months

Georgina Wilson, Doctoral Candidate, University of Oxford
Literary and Material Forms of Spatial Knowledge
Three months

About Fellowships

Available Fellowships
Joint Professorships/
Collaborative Fellowships
Apply for a Fellowship
Fellowship FAQs
Awarded Fellowships

Info for Fellows

Director's Welcome
Staff Contacts
Housing
Tax & Stipends
Visas
Social Security
Local Guide

Books by Fellows

Search books written by fellows

Research Resources

Ask LibAnswers
Become a Reader/Eligibility

AEON Login
Search Tools & Guides
Order Reproductions
Rights and Permissions
Library Services

Hours for Researchers

Mon., Wed., Fri., Sat.: 9 a.m.–5 p.m.
Tues., Thurs.: 9 a.m.–7 p.m.
Sunday and major holidays: CLOSED

Rare materials may be consulted in the Ahmanson Reading Room 9 a.m.–4:45 p.m.