Previously awarded fellowships:   2018–19   |   2017–18   |   2016–17   |   2015–16   |   2014–15   |   2013–14

2019–20 Awarded Fellowships

Long-Term Awards

Elizabeth Maddock Dillon, Professor, English, Northeastern UniversityR. STANTON AVERY DISTINGUISHED FELLOW

Elizabeth Maddock Dillon, Professor, English, Northeastern University

Topic: Geographies of Reproduction: Race, Gender, and Labor in the Early Atlantic World

Elizabeth Maddock Dillon is Distinguished Professor of English at Northeastern University and the founding Co-Director of the NULab for Maps, Texts, and Networks which conducts research in the fields of digital humanities and computational social science. She teaches in the fields of early American and Atlantic world literary studies, as well as literature and social justice, theatre studies, gender studies, and digital humanities. She is the author of New World Drama: The Performative Commons in the Atlantic World, 1659-1859 (Duke University Press in 2014) which received the Barnard Hewitt Award for Outstanding Research from the American Society of Theatre Research and The Gender of Freedom: Fictions of Liberalism and the Literary Public Sphere (Stanford University Press, 2004) which won the Heyman Prize for Outstanding Publication in the Humanities at Yale University. Together with Michael Drexler, she is co-editor of The Haitian Revolution and the Early U.S.: Histories, Geographies, and Textualities (University of Pennsylvania Press 2016). She is the Co-Director of the Futures of American Studies Institute at Dartmouth College. She is one of the founders of the award-winning Our Marathon project, a crowd-sourced on-line archive of the Boston Marathon bombings and of the Early Caribbean Digital Archive, an open access collection that engages with digital decolonization of the archive. She is currently working on two book projects, one on the Atlantic colonial origins of the novel, and a second titled Geographies of Reproduction: Sex, Gender, and Coloniality.


Dympna Callaghan, Professor, English, Syracuse UniversityFLETCHER JONES FOUNDATION DISTINGUISHED FELLOW

Dympna Callaghan, Professor, English, Syracuse University

Topic: Shakespeare’s Freeness of Speech

Dympna C. Callaghan is University Professor and William L. Safire Professor of Modern Letters in the Department of English at Syracuse University. She has published widely on the writers of the English Renaissance and was President of the Shakespeare Association of America in 2012-13. Callaghan has held fellowships at the Folger, Huntington and Newberry Libraries, and at the Getty Research Centre in Los Angeles, at Clare Hall and Hughes Hall at Cambridge University, and, at the Bogliasco Center for Arts and Humanities in Liguria, Italy. She is a Life Member of Clare Hall, Cambridge University, and she was Lloyd David distinguished fellow at the University of Queensland Australia for 2015. Her most recent books are: Who Was William Shakespeare? (2013); Hamlet: Language and Writing (2015); The Feminist Companion to Shakespeare (2nd edn. 2016); and Shakespeare in Our Time (2016), a volume prepared on behalf of the Shakespeare Association of America to commemorate the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death, which she co-edited with Suzanne Gossett. Callaghan is also the editor of the book series Arden Language and Writing, and co-editor, with Michael Dobson of the Palgrave Shakespeare monograph series.


James Walvin, Professor Emeritus, History, University of YorkLOS ANGELES TIMES DISTINGUISHED FELLOW

James Walvin, Professor Emeritus, History, University of York

Topic: Slavery Matters: Slavery and Modern Society

James Walvin is Professor of History Emeritus at the University of York, England. He has held fellowships and positions at The Australian National University, the University of the West Indies, Edinburgh, Yale and the College of William and Mary (where he was Kenan Distinguished Professor.) He has published widely on modern social history, more especially on the history of slavery and the slave trade. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature and in 2008 he was awarded an O.B.E. for services to scholarship.


Christopher Clark, Professor, History, University of Connecticut at StorrsROBERT C. RITCHIE DISTINGUISHED FELLOW

Christopher Clark, Professor, History, University of Connecticut at Storrs

Topic: The Age of Freehold: Land, Property, and Farming in American Ideology, 1750s-1950s

Christopher Clark is Professor of History at the University of Connecticut, where he has taught Early American History since 2005 and served as Head of the History Department from 2013 to 2018. He obtained his PhD from Harvard and taught at the University of York and then the University of Warwick before moving to Connecticut. He has held fellowships at Selwyn College Cambridge, St. Catherine’s College Oxford, the American Antiquarian Society, the Smithsonian Institution, and the University of Connecticut Humanities Institute. His books include The Roots of Rural Capitalism: Western Massachusetts, 1780-1860, which won the Organization of American Historians’ Frederick Jackson Turner Award; The Communitarian Moment: The Radical Challenge of the Northampton Association; Social Change in America from the Revolution through the Civil War; and (with Nancy Hewitt and others) two editions of the American Social History Project’s Who Built America? Working People and the Nation’s History.


Stephen Cushman, Professor, English, University of VirginiaROGERS DISTINGUISHED FELLOW IN 19th-CENTURY AMERICAN HISTORY

Stephen Cushman, Professor, English, University of Virginia

Topic: Mars Remembers: Civil War Writing and Public Imagination

Stephen Cushman is Robert C. Taylor Professor of English at the University of Virginia and the author of Bloody Promenade: Reflections on a Civil War Battle (University Press of Virginia, 1999) and Belligerent Muse: Five Northern Writers and How They Shaped Our Understanding of the Civil War (University of North Carolina Press, 2014), as well as recent essays about Alexander Gardner’s photography at Gettysburg; the Battle of the Crater in fiction; Philip Sheridan’s memoirs; Joseph E. Johnston’s surrender to William T. Sherman; and Richard Taylor’s Destruction and Reconstruction. He has published six volumes of poems and two critical studies of American poetry, and he is the general editor of the 2012 edition of the Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics. Cushman has been a fellow of the American Council of Learned Societies and a Fulbright Teaching Fellow in Greece. In 2014 he was named Cavalier Distinguished Professor, and in 2015 he won a State Council of Higher Education for Virginia Outstanding Faculty Award. A frequent speaker at Huntington Library Civil War conferences, he looks forward to joining the 2019-2020 community of scholars in San Marino, where he will be focusing on the emerging market for Civil War memoirs at the end of the nineteenth century and the influence of those memoirs on public imagination.


Edmund P. Russell, Professor, History, Carnegie Mellon UniversityDIBNER DISTINGUISHED FELLOW IN THE HISTORY OF SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY (AND JOHN SIMON GUGGENHEIM MEMORIAL FOUNDATION FELLOW IN RESIDENCE)

Edmund P. Russell, Professor, History, Carnegie Mellon University

Topic: United by Lightning: The Transcontinental Telegraph of 1861

Edmund Russell is a professor of history at Carnegie Mellon University, where he teaches environmental history and history of technology. Russell earned a B.A. in English at Stanford University and a Ph.D. in biology at the University of Michigan. Russell helped found two areas of research: the environmental history of war, and coevolutionary history (which studies the role of social forces in coevolution of human and non-human populations). His monographs include War and Nature: Fighting Humans and Insects with Chemicals from World War I to Silent Spring, Evolutionary History: Uniting History and Biology to Understand Life on Earth, and Greyhound Nation: A Coevolutionary History of England, 1200-1900. He coedited Natural Enemy, Natural Ally: Toward an Environmental History of War (with Richard Tucker) and CQ Guide to U.S. Environmental Policy (with Sally Fairfax). Russell has received the Edelstein Prize (Society for the History of Technology), the Rachel Carson Prize (American Society for Environmental History), the Leopold-Hidy Prize (American Society for Environmental History and Forest History Society), the Forum for the History of Science in America Prize, a National Science Foundation CAREER Award, the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia Outstanding Faculty Award, the Virginia Alumni Board of Trustees Teaching Award, and a Guggenheim Fellowship. Russell is president of the American Society for Environmental History and a former vice president of the American Historical Association. At The Huntington Library, Russell will be working on the first scholarly book on the U.S. transcontinental telegraph, which was completed in 1861.


Jack Hartnell, Lecturer, Art History, University of East AngliaDIBNER RESEARCH FELLOW IN THE HISTORY OF SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY

Jack Hartnell, Lecturer, Art History, University of East Anglia

Topic: Wound Man: The Many Lives of a Medieval and Early Modern Surgical Image

Jack Hartnell is Lecturer in Art History at the University of East Anglia where his research and teaching focus is on the visual culture of medieval and renaissance science. His most recent book, Medieval Bodies: Life, Death and Art in the Middle Ages, was published in 2018 with the Wellcome Collection, London. At The Huntington, Jack will be completing his next book which traces the vibrant history of the so-called ‘Wound Man’, a graphic diagram of injury and surgical cure that spread from fourteenth-century Europe to eighteenth-century Japan.


Antoine Lentacker, Assistant Professor, History, University of California, RiversideDIBNER RESEARCH FELLOW IN THE HISTORY OF SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY

Antoine Lentacker, Assistant Professor, History, University of California, Riverside

Topic: Secret Remedies: Making Media and Medicines in Modern Europe, 1770-1930

Antoine Lentacker is Assistant Professor in the Department of History at UC Riverside. His work focuses on the intersections between the histories of science, medicine, and media in modern Europe. At the Huntington in 2019-20 he will be at work on a book project entitled Secret Remedies: Making Media and Medicines in Modern Europe, 1770-1930, a study of the genres and media in which knowledge about drugs used to be made and disseminated in the long nineteenth century. The project’s goal is to paint a broad picture of how drugs were known and trusted before the era of modern regulation, while also highlighting drugs’ unique ability to reveal changing attitudes toward the written word. Essays related to this project have appeared or are forthcoming in Social Studies of Science, The Journal of Modern History, and Representations.


Dawna Schuld, Assistant Professor, Visualization (Art History), Texas A&M UniversityDANA AND DAVID DORNSIFE FELLOW

Dawna Schuld, Assistant Professor, Visualization (Art History), Texas A&M University

Topic: Mining the Gap: The Artist Residency and Interdisciplinary Fallout in Southern California during the Cold War

Dawna Schuld is Assistant Professor of Modern and Contemporary Art History in the Department of Visualization, Texas A&M University. Her research focuses on the intersections between art, technology, and the sciences, with an emphasis on how the phenomena of perception are implemented as artistic media. She is the author of Minimal Conditions: Light, Space, and Subjectivity (The University of California Press, 2018), and co-editor, with Cristina Albu (University of Missouri, Kansas City), of Perception and Agency in Shared Spaces of Contemporary Art (Routledge, 2018).


Emily Berquist Soule, Associate Professor, History, California State University, Long BeachFLETCHER JONES FOUNDATION FELLOW

Emily Berquist Soule, Professor of History, California State University, Long Beach

Topic: The Atlantic Slave Trade and the Rise and Fall of the Spanish Empire

Emily Berquist Soule is a historian of the Spanish Empire and Colonial Latin America. She is presently at work on a 500-year history of the slave trade in Spain and Spanish America, The Atlantic Slave Trade and the Rise and Fall of the Spanish Empire (under contract with Yale University Press). The book explores how the slave trade stood at the foundation of the Spanish Empire, from Spain’s first overseas explorations to the Canary Islands in the early fifteenth century through the loss of its final American colonies in the late nineteenth century. It explores how Spain’s involvement in the slave trade was motivated by profit; built on a rhetoric of difference legitimated by religion; and sustained by policies of governance organized around race. It makes the case that slavery stood at the center of the emerging global economy of capitalism; lay at the foundation of the bodies of laws that organized human society; and was inseparable from the rhetoric of world geopolitical relations. Previous research funding for this project includes a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Humanities (2015-2016), and an American Philosophical Society Franklin Research Grant (2018). Related journal articles have appeared in Atlantic Studies and Slavery and Abolition. Berquist Soule’s first monograph, The Bishop’s Utopia: Imagining Improvement in Colonial Peru (Pennsylvania, 2014), was written with the support of a Fulbright Fellowship (2003-2004), an American Council of Learned Societies Fellowship (2011-2012), and a Dibner Fellowship in the History of Science at the Huntington Library (2003-2004), as well as multiple smaller grants. Berquist Soule completed her B.A. cum laude at Vassar College, and her Ph.D. at the University of Texas at Austin, where she studied under Jorge Cañizares-Esguerra. She is Professor of History at California State University, Long Beach.


Sayuri Shimizu, Professor, History, Rice UniversityKEMBLE FELLOW IN MARITIME HISTORY

Sayuri Shimizu, Professor, History, Rice University

Topic: A Sea Change: Enclosure of the North Pacific Commons

Sayuri Guthrie Shimizu is Dunlevie Family Professor of History at Rice University. She teaches and researches in the history of the United States’ relations with the wider world. She received her MA and Ph. D. in history from Cornell University. She is the author of several books, most recently, Transpacific Field of Dreams: How Baseball Linked the United States and Japan in Peace and War (University of North Carolina Press, 2012). At Huntington, she will work on her current book project A Sea Change: The Enclosure of the Pacific Commons.


Ben Davidson, Fellow, History, Smithsonian InstitutionMELLON FELLOW

Ben Davidson, Fellow, History, Smithsonian Institution

Topic: Freedom’s Generation: Coming of Age in the Era of Emancipation

Ben Davidson completed his PhD in United States history at New York University in 2018, and he held a James Smithson Postdoctoral Fellowship at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C during the 2018-2019 academic year. At The Huntington Library, he will work on completing research and revisions for his book manuscript, “Freedom’s Generation: Coming of Age in the Era of Emancipation.” This project traces the lives of the generation of black and white children, in the North, South, and West, who grew up during the Civil War era, exploring how young people across the nation learned persistent lessons, carried into adulthood, about complexities intrinsic to ideas and experiences of emancipation. In support of research for this project, Davidson has received long-term fellowships from the U.S. Department of Education and New York University, and short-term fellowships from institutions including the American Historical Association, the Massachusetts Historical Society, the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, and the Virginia Historical Society. He has taught high school English, worked as a researcher for a children’s book publisher, and taught History 101 at NYU, among other courses.


Urmi Willoughby, Assistant Professor, History, Murray State UniversityMOLINA FELLOW IN THE HISTORY OF MEDICINE & ALLIED SCIENCES

Urmi Willoughby, Independent Scholar

Topic: Cultivating Malaria: The Historical Ecology of Fever in Lower Louisiana’s Wetlands, 1716-1860

Urmi Engineer Willoughby is an independent scholar. She completed her doctorate at the University of California, Santa Cruz and has held postdoctoral fellowships at Colby College and the University of Pittsburgh’s World History Center and a faculty position at Murray State University. She approaches histories of disease and medicine from a global and ecological perspective. Her research focuses on disease and ecology in the Mississippi Valley, Gulf South, and Caribbean, and draws connections between the southern United States, the colonial Atlantic, and South Asia. Her first book, Yellow Fever, Race, and Ecology in Nineteenth-Century New Orleans, was published in Louisiana University Press’s series on “The Natural World of the Gulf South.” It was awarded the 2017 Williams prize for best book in Louisiana history. The book examines the environmental, social, and cultural history of yellow fever epidemics in New Orleans in a global framework. Her current project, titled Cultivating Malaria, is an environmental and cultural history of malaria in the Gulf Coast and Lower Mississippi Valley.


Verónica Castillo Muñoz, Associate Professor, History, University of California, Santa BarbaraNATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES FELLOW

Verónica Castillo Muñoz, Associate Professor, History, University of California, Santa Barbara

Topic: Women and Revolution: A Tale of Violence and Deception Across the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands

Verónica Castillo-Muñoz is Associate Professor in the Department of History at the University of California, Santa Barbara. She is an interdisciplinary scholar with training in Gender history, Latin America, and U.S. history. She has written widely on the intersections between gender, family migration, and the U.S.-Mexico borderlands. Castillo-Muñoz is the author of the book, The Other California: Land Identity and Politics on the Mexican Borderlands, published by the University of California Press (2016). Her current book project, Women and Revolution: A Tale of Violence and Deception Across the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands, uses intimacy as a lens to understand how gender operated during the Mexican Revolution (1910-1920), and how women negotiated war, violence, and family separations at the U.S.-Mexico border. She is also the Book Reviews Editor for the Journal of Mexican Studies/ Estudios Mexicanos (UC Press). While at The Huntington, she will be working on a project entitled Women and Revolution: A Tale of Violence and Deception Across the U.S.- Mexico Borderlands.


Katie Moore, Assistant Professor, History, University of California, Santa BarbaraNATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES FELLOW

Katie Moore, Assistant Professor, History, University of California, Santa Barbara

Topic: A Revolutionary Currency: Money, Sovereignty, and the Origins of American Independence

Katie A. Moore is Assistant Professor of History at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Prior to that she was Assistant Professor of History at Texas Tech University. Her research focuses on early North America and the history of capitalism, with a particular emphasis on the history of money. She has published articles in Pennsylvania History and Early American Studies and has received fellowships from the Massachusetts Historical Society and the Library Company of Philadelphia. At The Huntington she will be completing work on her book entitled A Revolutionary Currency: Money, Sovereignty, and the Origins of American Independence.


Lauren R. Cannady, Assistant Director of Research and Academic Program, History of Art, Clark Art InstituteBARBARA THOM POSTDOCTORAL FELLOW

Lauren R. Cannady, Assistant Director of Research and Academic Program, History of Art, Clark Art Institute

Topic: Green Thoughts: The Garden in Early Modern Europe

Lauren R. Cannady is assistant director of the Research and Academic Program at the Clark Art Institute and lecturer in the Williams Graduate Program in the History of Art. She received her PhD from New York University, where she specialized in early modern European art, architecture, and the history of ideas. At the Huntington she will complete a book manuscript titled Green Thoughts: The Garden in Early Modern Europe, which examines the transmission of natural knowledge through pattern, garden design, and ornament in seventeenth- and early eighteenth-century Europe. She is also co-editor, with Jennifer Ferng, of the forthcoming Crafting Artisanal Praxis: Networks of Power in the Long Eighteenth Century. While at The Huntington, she will be working on a project entitled Green Thoughts: The Garden in Early Modern Europe.


Sarah Rodriguez, Assistant Professor, History, University of Arkansas, FayettevilleBARBARA THOM POSTDOCTORAL FELLOW

Sarah Rodriguez, Assistant Professor, History, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville

Topic: “Children of the Great Mexican Family”: Anglo American Immigration to Mexico and the Making of the United States Empire, 1820-1867

Sarah Rodríguez is assistant professor of history at the University of Arkansas. Her research interests include U.S. imperialism, expansion, borderlands, labor, and comparative political history. Her current book manuscript, Children of the Great Mexican Family: Texas, Anglo-American Migration, and the Rise of the U.S. Empire, 1821-1867, reconsiders the causes and consequences of the United States’ dramatic rise to continental dominance at the middle of the nineteenth century. Originally from Pasadena, she attended Vassar College and the University of Pennsylvania where she received her PhD in 2015 before joining the history department at the University of Arkansas.


Justina Spencer, Fellow, Art History, Carleton UniversityBARBARA THOM POSTDOCTORAL FELLOW

Justina Spencer, Fellow, Art History, Carleton University

Topic: Peeping In, Peering Out: Monocularity and Early Modern Art

Justina Spencer is a Postdoctoral Fellow at Carleton University. She holds a Ph.D. in art history from Oxford University. Her primary research interest concerns how early modern artists conceptualized and translated three-dimensional space onto the canvas or page, whether by means of linear perspective, optical instrumentation, or cartography. Her work has appeared in the Journal of the History of Collections and Intersections: Interdisciplinary Studies in Early Modern Culture. At The Huntington Library, she is completing her first book, Peeping In, Peering Out: Monocularity and Early Modern Vision, which explores the role of monocular vision in the development of linear perspective and anamorphosis from the fifteenth to the seventeenth century. This study probes the discrepancy between natural and pictorial perspective and argues that monocular art forms—such as Dutch perspective boxes—were collected and interpreted as intellectual exercises used to sharpen visual and rhetorical acumen.


Eva Mroczek, Associate Professor, Theology, University of California, DavisACLS/BURKHARDT FELLOW

Eva Mroczek, Associate Professor, Theology, University of California, Davis

Topic: Out of the Cave: The Possibility of a New Scriptural Past

Eva Mroczek received her PhD from the University of Toronto in 2012 and is Associate Professor in the Department of Religious Studies at the University of California, Davis. She works at the intersection of Jewish antiquity, the history of biblical interpretation, and Book History. Her first book, The Literary Imagination in Jewish Antiquity (Oxford UP 2016), illustrates how early Jewish writers imagined their own sacred writing before the Bible existed as a book and a concept. It was awarded the 2017 De Long Prize in Book History from SHARP and was the finalist for the 2018 Jordan Schnitzer Prize from the Association for Jewish Studies. She is currently completing a guide to the many imaginary books mentioned in ancient and medieval Jewish literature. Her project at The Huntington library is Out of the Cave: The Possibility of a New Scriptural Past, a history of the very idea of textual discovery. The famous story about the discovery of the Dead Sea Scrolls by a Bedouin shepherd in a desert cave is not isolated. Its contours are basically true, but it stands in a tradition that dates to antiquity, spanning the boundary between premodern religious mythmaking and modern scholarship. Identifying the discovery narrative as a durable genre of historical and theological discourse—both in and about Jewish and Christian texts—this project illustrates how such stories are sites where basic problems of the historical and religious imagination are worked out. It reveals that tales of textual loss and recovery lie at the heart of how ancient and modern people understand the survival of the past and its incursions into the present and asks what happens to tradition in light of belated discoveries of hidden knowledge—unknown scriptural pasts.


Alejandra Dubcovsky, Associate Professor, History, University of California, RiversideFLETCHER JONES FOUNDATION FELLOW IN THE HUNTINGTON-UC PROGRAM FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF THE HUMANITIES

Alejandra Dubcovsky, Associate Professor, History, University of California, Riverside

Topic: At the Frontlines of a Forgotten War: Conflict and Gender in La Florida

Alejandra Dubcovsky is an associate professor of history at the University of California, Riverside. She is also the inaugural fellow in the Program for the Advancement of the Humanities, a partnership of The Huntington and UC Riverside that aims to support the future of the humanities. She received her BA and PhD from UC Berkeley, and a Masters in Library and Information Science from San Jose State. Her first book, Informed Power: Communication in the Early American South (HUP 2016), won the 2016 Michael V. R. Thomason Book Award from the Gulf South Historical Association. Her works has been featured in Ethnohistory, Early America Studies, The Journal of Southern History, Native South, and the William and Mary Quarterly, among others. She has served in the editorial boards of the journals of Ethnohistory (2015-2018), NAISA (2017-2020), and Native South (2016-2021). In 2018, she was awarded a Mellon Advancing Intercultural Studies Grant and a UC Riverside-Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM) Faculty Exchange Grant. Her new project, At the Frontlines of a Forgotten War, Gender, Violence, and Conflict in La Florida examines several fronts of Queen Anne’s War (1702-1713) through the lives and experiences of women. It interrogates the role of women and gender in violent conflict, and reconsiders who narrates stories of war, loss, and victory.


Fuson Wang, Assistant Professor, English, University of California, RiversideFLETCHER JONES FOUNDATION FELLOW IN THE HUNTINGTON-UC PROGRAM FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF THE HUMANITIES

Fuson Wang, Assistant Professor, English, University of California, Riverside

Topic: Nasty, Brutish, and Long: Romantic Disability Theory at the Brink of Normal

Fuson Wang is an assistant professor of English at the University of California, Riverside. He specializes in British Romantic literature and medical humanities. Having received undergraduate degrees in both mathematics and English literature, Fuson tends to approach literary studies with a consciously interdisciplinary orientation. His current book manuscript, The Smallpox Report: Vaccination and the Medico-Literary Genres of Romantic Disease, argues that smallpox's eventual eradication in 1980 was as much a triumph of the Romantic-era literary imagination as it was an achievement of medical Enlightenment science. During his residence at The Huntington, he will begin work on a second book project on Romantic-era disability representation, tentatively titled Nasty, Brutish, and Long: Romantic Disability Theory at the Brink of Normal.


John Styles, Professor Emeritus, History, University of HertfordshireELEANOR SEARLE VISITING PROFESSOR IN HISTORY AT CALTECH AND THE HUNTINGTON

John Styles, Professor Emeritus, History, University of Hertfordshire

Topic: Textiles, Technologies and Markets, Britain and its Empire, 1500-1780

John Styles is Professor Emeritus in History at the University of Hertfordshire, UK, where he was previously Research Professor in History. Before taking up his research professorship at Hertfordshire, he was Head of Graduate Studies at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, where he remains Senior Honorary Research Fellow. He specializes in the history of early modern Britain and its empire, especially the study of material life, manufacturing and design. His most recent books are Gender, Taste and Material Culture in Britain and North America, 1700-1830 (co-edited with Amanda Vickery, 2006), The Dress of the People: Everyday Fashion in Eighteenth-Century England (2007), and Threads of Feeling: The London Foundling Hospital’s Textile Tokens, 1740-1770 (2010). His exhibition, ‘Threads of Feeling’, was displayed at the London Foundling Museum in 2010-11 and at the de Witt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum at Colonial Williamsburg, Virginia, USA in 2013-14. From 2010 to 2015 he held a European Research Council Advanced Grant for his research project ‘Spinning in the Era of the Spinning Wheel, 1400 to 1800’ (www.spinning-wheel.org). He is currently writing a book on fashion, textiles and the origins of Industrial Revolution.


Erik Conway, Historian, Jet Propulsion LaboratoryFELLOW IN THE ROGERS/RESEARCH INSTITUTE FOR THE HISTORY OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY AT CALTECH AND THE HUNTINGTON (RIHST@CH)

Erik Conway, Historian, Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Topic: A Prelude to Market Fundamentalism: Southern California Edison’s resistance to Public Power

Erik Conway is a historian of science and technology. He completed a Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota in 1998, with a dissertation on the development of aircraft landing aids. He currently works as the historian of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a unit of Caltech. Most of his work since has been at the intersection of science and technology in the later 20th century, and mostly related to aerospace. His most recent book was Exploration and Engineering: The Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the Quest for Mars, published in 2015, and he recently received a Guggenheim Fellowship with Naomi Oreskes. Prior to graduate school, he served as an officer in the U.S. Navy for four years, serving as a Damage Control Assistant and Acting Chief Engineer on a tank landing ship, and then as an operations officer for COMPHIBRON ONE in San Diego, CA.

Short-Term Awards

Danielle Abdon Guimaraes, Doctoral Candidate, Temple University
Poverty, Disease, and Port Cities: Global Exchanges in Hospital Architecture during the Age of Exploration
Two months

Travis Alexander, Doctoral Candidate, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
A Glamorous Nightmare: Race, AIDS, and the Biopolitics of American Literary Study
One month

Charles Altieri, Professor, University of California, Berkeley
Edition of Wallace Stevens Journals
One month

Arinn Amer, Doctoral Candidate, Graduate Center, City University of New York
Tar and Feathers: Colonial Culture and the Making of Patriot Violence
One month

Harriet Archer, Lecturer, University of St Andrews
Thomas Norton and Thomas Sackville's Gorboduc: A New Critical Edition
One month

Sarah Bane, Doctoral Candidate, University of California, Santa Barbara
Join the Club: Regional Print Clubs during the Interwar Period in the United States
One month

Edward Barnet , Doctoral Candidate, Stanford University
Homo Musicus: The Early Modern Musical Science of the Human Body
Two months

Rebecca Anne Barr, Assistant Professor, National University of Ireland, Galway
Community and the subject in the work of Samuel Richardson
One month

Zach Bates, Doctoral Candidate, University of Calgary
Scottish Colonial Administrators and the Idea of the British Empire and Constitution, 1710-1763
One month

Megan Baumhammer, Doctoral Candidate, Princeton University
Life Imagined: representation in teaching anatomy and botany at the University of Padua, 1600-1700
Two months

Michael Berlin, Doctoral Candidate, University of California, Irvine
The Poetry of Origins: Odes, Recantation, and Literary History
Two months

Mark Bland, Independent Scholar
Money and Books: The World of Simon Waterson, Stationer
Three months

Katherine Blankenau, Doctoral Candidate, Northwestern University
Entertaining strangers: Hospitality and early modern England’s literary marketplace
One month

Carlos Blanton, Professor, Texas A&M University
Between Black and White: The Chicana/o in the American Mind
One month

Rachel Bolten, Doctoral Candidate, Stanford University
To Describe America, 1835-1967
One month

Robert Bonner, Professor, Dartmouth College
The Maritime Menace of the Southern Confederacy
One month

William Bowers, Fellow, Oxford University
Holland House, 1797-1830
Two months

Kenneth Brandt, Professor, Savannah College of Art and Design
Jack London Critical Lives Biography
One month

Emma Butcher, Fellow, University of Leicester
Children and the Culture of War in the Nineteenth Century
One month

Ernesto Capello, Associate Professor, Macalester College
Mapping Mountains: A review of cartographic depictions of mountains
One month

Sara Caputo, Doctoral Candidate, University of Cambridge
Transnational Encounters in the British Navy, 1793-1815
Three months

Aaron Cayer, Assistant Professor, University of New Mexico
Design and Profit: Architecture Practice at the Dawn of Neoliberalism
One month

Urvashi Chakravarty, Assistant Professor, George Mason University
Dark Futures: Slavery and the Reproduction of Race in the Early Modern British Atlantic World
One month

Miguel Chavez, Doctoral Candidate, Vanderbilt University
Professionalizing Science: British Geography and the Exploration of Africa
One month

Irene Cheng, Assistant Professor, California College of the Arts
Bungalow, Forest, Plantation: The Material Constitution of Arts & Crafts Architecture
One month

Mai-Lin Cheng, Associate Professor, University of Oregon
Autotopography: Place and Commonplace in Romanticism and After
Two months

Calina Ciobanu, Assistant Professor, United States Naval Academy
The Global Novel in the Age of Disposability
Two months

Joanna Cohen, Associate Professor, Queen Mary University of London
What Was Mine: Property and Loss in Civil War America
One month

Tara Contractor, Doctoral Candidate, Yale University
British Gilt: Gold in Painting 1790-1914
One month

Megan Cook, Assistant Professor, Colby College
Imaginative Heraldry, 1350-1600
One month

Daniel Couch, Assistant Professor, United States Air Force Academy
American Fragments: The Political Aesthetic of Literary Ruins in the Early Republic
One month

Eleanor Coulter, Doctoral Candidate, McGill University
Geographies of space, geographies of time: narrative cartographies in eighteenth-century French maps
One month

Joseph Cozens, Adjunct Faculty, University College London
Militarisation and Protest: Soldiers and Social Conflict in Britain, 1789-1819
One month

Lilla Maria Crisafulli, Professor, University of Bologna
Romantic women playwrights and Larpent censorship
One month

James Davey, Lecturer, University of Exeter
The Royal Navy and the Age of Revolution: Politics, Culture and the British Imperial State
Three months

Amy Dunagin, Assistant Professor, Kennesaw State University
The Land without Music: English Identity and the Italian Other
Two months

Phillip Emanuel, Doctoral Candidate, College of William and Mary
‘The diligent man becomes necessary’: Performing knowledge of the Atlantic World, 1650-1713
Two months

Margaret Rosemary Englander, Professor Emeritus, The Open University
A Scholarly Edition of Temple Family Papers held at the Huntington
Two months

Nicholas Fenech, Doctoral Candidate, Stanford University
Early Modern Tragedy and the Critique of Humanism: George Buchanan and Euripides
One month

Ariane Fennetaux, Associate Professor, Paris Diderot University
The British Empire's New Clothes c.1600-1851
One month

Eileen Ford, Associate Professor, California State University, Los Angeles
From Chicago to Catalina: William Wrigley Jr.'s Influence in American Culture and Society
Three months

Graham Foster, Independent Researcher
The English Isherwood
One month

Edoardo Frezet, Doctoral Candidate, University of Côte d'Azur
From Restoration to Reconstruction Francis Lieber's transatlantic networks
Two months

Daniella Gáti, Doctoral Candidate, Brandeis University
The Vignette and the Development of Typographical Ornament in the Early Printed Book
Two months

Katherine Gillen, Associate Professor, Texas A&M University, San Antonio
Race, Rome, and Early Modern Drama: The Whitening of England and the Classical World
Two months

Lori Ginzberg, Professor, Pennsylvania State University
Collage and Narrative: One Family's Story and the Making of American History
One month

Catherine Gudis, Associate Professor, University of California, Riverside
Skid Row, By Design: History, Community, and Activism in Downtown L.A.
Three months

Kathleen Gutierrez, Doctoral Candidate, University of California, Berkeley
The Politics of Science in an Imperial Enterprise: Contending Botanical Knowledge in the Colonial Philippines
One month

Arang Ha, Doctoral Candidate, Rice University
Free Labor, Free Trade, and Free Immigration: The Vision of the Pacific Community After the Civil War
One month

Marie-Aude Haffen, Associate Professor, University of Montpellier III
Christopher Isherwood's Life-Writing
Two months

Cailey Hall, Doctoral Candidate, University of California, Los Angeles
Visceral Romanticism: The Literature and Culture of Digestion, 1780-1830
Two months

Jan Hansen, Assistant Professor, Humboldt University of Berlin
Urban Infrastructure and Everyday Life in Los Angeles, 1860-1940
One month

Craig Hanson, Associate Professor, Calvin College
Before and After: The History of a Visual Convention
One month

Karen Harvey, Professor, University of Birmingham
Social Bodies: Communities of Embodiment in Letters, Britain, 1680-1820
One month

Jessica Hines, Assistant Professor, Birmingham Southern College
Forms of Suffering: Chaucer, Aesthetics, and the Invention of Pity
Two months

Jean Ho, Doctoral Candidate, University of Southern California
Chinese American Pioneers in 19th Century Los Angeles
Two months

Sharrissa Iqbal, Doctoral Candidate, University of California, Irvine
Alternative Abstractions: Art and Science in 20th Century Los Angeles
One month

Felicity James, Associate Professor, University of Leicester
The Collaborative Children's Writing of Charles and Mary Lamb
One month

Andrew Keener, Assistant Professor, Santa Clara University
Colonial Translations in John Fletcher's Early Modern Transatlantic
Two months

Meegan Kennedy, Associate Professor, Florida State University
A Portable Vastness: Moving microscopy in the Victorian age
Two months

Hyoungee Kong, Doctoral Candidate, Pennsylvania State University
Fleshly Japonisme: Japonisme and Women’s Bodies in France 1870-1914
Two months

Sebastian Langdell, Assistant Professor, Baylor University
The Collected Shorter Poems of Thomas Hoccleve: A Critical Edition
One month

Alexander Lash, Doctoral Candidate, Columbia University
Doors, Noises, and Magic Hats: The Tools of Spatial Representation on the Seventeenth Century Stage
Two months

John Leffel, Assistant Professor, SUNY College at Cortland
A Romantic Circles Critical Edition of Edward Topham’s "Bonds without Judgment, or The Loves of Bengal" (1787)
One month

Gustave Lester, Doctoral Candidate, Harvard University
Mineral Lands, Mineral Empires: Geology and Capitalism in the Atlantic World, 1780-1880
Two months

Lena Liapi, Fellow, Keele University
Famous: News, Reputation and Public Opinion (1600-1720)
One month

Rory Loughnane, Associate Professor, University of Kent
How to Live and Die in Early Modern England
One month

Deborah Lutz, Professor, University of Louisville
Album, Notebook, Paper-craft: Women Writing in Nineteenth-Century Britain
One month

Viviane Mahieux, Associate Professor, University of California, Irvine
Mexico’s Journalistic Modernity: Imagining a Nation of Readers
Two months

Alan Malfavon, Doctoral Candidate, University of California, Riverside
Kin of the Leeward Port: Afro-Mexicans in Veracruz Amidst State Formation, Contested Spaces, and Regional Development, 1770-1836
Three months

Rheagan Martin, Doctoral Candidate, University of Michigan
Printing and Experience in Fifteenth-Century Venice
One month

Caroline McCracken-Flesher, Professor, University of Wyoming
Kidnapped, and Robert Louis Stevenson's Circulations of Scotland
One month

James Misson, Doctoral Candidate, University of Oxford
Materializing Texts with Sixteenth-Century Typography
One month

Brandon Munda, Doctoral Candidate, College of William and Mary
The Spyglass and the Mirror: Competitive Intelligence and Trans-Imperial State Formation in the War of Spanish Succession
One month

Dina Murokh, Doctoral Candidate, University of Southern California
"A Sort of Picture Gallery": The Visual Culture of Antebellum America
One month

Warren Oakley, Independent Scholar
The Letters of Thomas Harris and Covent Garden Theatre, 1767-1829
One month

Meredith Oda, Associate Professor, University of Nevada, Reno
Alien Belonging: Japanese American Post-Incarceration Resettlement in the Era of Exclusion
One month

Charles Parker, Professor, Saint Louis University
Global Protestantism: Conversion, Empire, and Identity, 1600-1830
Two months

Glyn Parry, Professor, University of Roehampton
A New Context for HEHL MS HM 715
One month

Rachael Pasierowska, Doctoral Candidate, Rice University
Beasts, Birds, and Bondsmen: Animal and Slave Interactions in Atlantic World Slavery
Two months

Samantha Pergadia, Doctoral Candidate, Washington University in St. Louis
Racism, Speciesism, and the Ends of Comparison
One month

Marina Peterson, Associate Professor, University of Texas, Austin
Weather Patterns: Engineering Atmospheric Uncertainty in LA
Three months

Jenna Phillips, Fellow, Johns Hopkins University
Sound, Violence, and the Period Ear in Thirteenth-Century France
Two months

Megan Piorko, Doctoral Candidate, Georgia State University
Chymical Collections: Seventeenth-Century Textual Transmutations in the work of Arthur Dee and Elias Ashmole
One month

Tessie Prakas, Assistant Professor, Scripps College
Poetic Priesthood: Reformed Ministry and Radical Verse in the Seventeenth Century
Two months

Megan Quigley, Associate Professor, Villanova University
T.S. Eliot Among the Novelists
One month

Sarah Reeser, Doctoral Candidate, University of Toronto
“A Work of Utmost Importance”: Peter Martyr d'Anghiera's 1511 Opera and the American History of a Transatlantic Text
One month

David Rex Galindo, Associate Professor, Universidad Adolfo Ibáñez
An Enlightened Scientist: Jerónimo Boscana, Franciscan Missions, and California Ethnography
Two months

Luis Rodriguez-Rincon, Doctoral Candidate, Stanford University
Pagan Nature: Poetry as Natural History in the Early Modern Transatlantic World
Three months

Colleen Rosenfeld, Associate Professor, Pomona College
Poetry and the Potential Mood in Early Modern England
One month

Marjorie Rubright, Associate Professor, University of Massachusetts, Amherst
A World of Words: Language, Earth and Embodiment in the Renaissance
Two months

Deborah Russell, Lecturer, University of York
Shadows and Silence: Gothic Obscurity on Stage
One month

Martha Rust, Associate Professor, New York University
Item: Lists and Poetics of Reckoning in Late Medieval England
Two months

Paul Sampson, Doctoral Candidate, Rutgers University
Ventilating the Empire: Environmental Machines in the British Atlantic World, 1700-1850
Two months

Sierra Senzaki, Doctoral Candidate, University of Texas at Austin
“The Secret of the Universe”: Ether Theory and the British Novel, 1870-1930
One month

Shirlynn Sham, Doctoral Candidate, Yale University
Visual Modernity and the Industrial Subterranean, 1826-1941
One month

Eleanor Shipton, Doctoral Candidate, University of Exeter
Postal Bodies: Imagining Communication and Transportation Networks in Nineteenth-Century Literature
One month

Chelsea Silva, Doctoral Candidate, University of California, Riverside
Bedwritten: Middle English Medicine and the Ailing Author
One month

Dorin Smith, Doctoral Candidate, Brown University
Fictional Brains: Reflecting on the Neural Subject in the Nineteenth-Century American Novel
Three months

Frederick Smith, Doctoral Candidate, University of Cambridge
Rethinking Religious Radicalism: Anti-Anabaptism and the English Reformation, 1533-1640
Two months

Laura Stewart, Professor, University of York
Political news and information in early modern Scotland, c.1587 - c.1727
Two months

Kristina Straub, Professor, Carnegie Mellon University
Academia on the Market: Theatre, Gender, and Public Knowledge, 1660-1760
Two months

Emma Sutton, Associate Professor, University of St Andrews
Robert Louis Stevenson: Writing and Music from Scotland to Samoa
One month

Hillary Taylor, Fellow, Jesus College, Cambridge
Social Relations in Early Modern England
Two months

Vanina Teglia, Assistant Professor, Universidad de Buenos Aires
Knowing the Unknown in the West Indies: Gonzalo Fernández de Oviedo’s Book of Deposits
One month

Taylor Tobias, Doctoral Candidate, Florida State University
Imperial Players: Theatre, Culture, and Power in the 19th Century World
One month

Ted Vallance, Professor, University of Roehampton
“Cromwell’s Slaughter-House”: The High Court of Justice in the Interregnum as an Instrument of Revolutionary Justice
One month

Christine Varnado, Assistant Professor, SUNY Buffalo
Queering Birth: The Problem of Life in Literature
Two months

Alana Vincent, Associate Professor, University of Chester
Narratives of Post-Memory in Octavia Butler’s Earthseed
One month

Daniel Wakelin, Professor, University of Oxford
The Immaterials: Resisting the Material Text in Medieval England
One month

Hannah Wallace, Doctoral Candidate, University of Sheffield
Community, Conflict and Change at Chatsworth, 1700-1811
One month

Yuhe Wang, Doctoral Candidate, Yale University
Bureaucratic Violence: Paper Forms, Racial Capitalism, and Emerging Infrastructures in 19th Century California
One month

Briana Whiteside, Assistant Professor, University of Nevada, Las Vegas
Octavia E. Butler: History, Culture, and Healing Justice
Two months

Courtney Wilder, Doctoral Candidate, University of Michigan
Novel Impressions in Printed Textiles, 1815-1851
Two months

Kacie Wills, Adjunct Faculty, University of California, Riverside
The Hot Air Balloon and the Scrapbook: The Technology and the Media of the Ballooning Craze
One month

Peter Wirzbicki, Assistant Professor, Princeton University
The Abolitionist Nation: An Intellectual History of Nation, Democracy, and Race during Reconstruction, 1863-1877
One month

Antonina Woodsum, Doctoral Candidate, Columbia University
Fiesta Immemorial: Settler and Native Political Economies in Southern California
Four months

Atlas Tian Xu, Doctoral Candidate, Catholic University of America
Navigating Worthiness in America: White Attorneys, Chinese Immigrants, and Black Pensioners (1873-1943)
One month

Cecily Zander, Doctoral Candidate, Pennsylvania State University
Agents of Empire: The U.S. Army, Native Americans, and the Civil War in the Making of the American West
One month

Alan Jutzi Fellows

Josh Dean, Independent Scholar
Kelly Johnson and the Lockheed Skunk Works
One month

Joyce Morgan, Independent Scholar
Biography of Elizabeth von Armin
One month

Thomas W. Wilkins Fellows

Colby Gordon, Assistant Professor, Bryn Mawr College
Glorious Bodies: Trans Theology and Renaissance Literature
One month

Vikram Tamboli, Lecturer, University of California, Los Angeles
Black Powers and Bush Work: Rumor, Race, and Trafficking on the Essequibo, 1763 to the Present
One month

Mary Robertson Fellow in Tudor Studies

Diarmaid MacCulloch, Professor, University of Oxford
Sex, Gender, and Religion in the Early Modern World
One month

Joint Fellows

American Society for Eighteenth Century Studies
Simon Sun, Doctoral Candidate, Harvard University
Thomas Jefferson’s Hau Kiou Choaan: China and Early America (1497-1784)

Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies
Ian Moulton, Professor, Arizona State University
“His Own Forever”: The Rhetoric of Possession and Affection in Early Modern Europe

Clark-Huntington Joint Bibliographical
Catherine Evans, Doctoral Candidate, University of Sheffield
Writing Time and Re-timing Sermons
One month

Florida Atlantic University
Dusty Dye, Doctoral Candidate, University of Maryland, College Park
“A Decent External Sorrow”: Death, Mourning, and the American Revolution
One month

Brandon Munda, Doctoral Candidate, College of William and Mary
The Spyglass and the Mirror: Competitive Intelligence and Trans-Imperial State Formation in the War of Spanish Succession
One month

Sean Morey Smith, Doctoral Candidate, Rice University
Abolition and the Making of Scientific Racism in the Anglophone Atlantic
One month

North American Conference on British Studies
Zach Bates, Doctoral Candidate, University of Calgary
Scottish Colonial Administrators and the Idea of the British Empire and Constitution, 1710-1763
One month

Renaissance Society of America
Jacob Tootalian, Instructor, Portland State University
Mists and Uncertainties: Poetic Figuration and English Scientific Prose, 1640-1671
One month

Rocky Mountain Modern Language Association
Louise Cardoso de Mello, Doctoral Candidate, Universidad Pablo de Olavide
From Fortified Plazas to Social Arenas: Cross-frontier Relations in the Fortresses of Southwest Amazonia during the 18th and 19th centuries
One month

Shakespeare Association of America
Evan Choate, Doctoral Candidate, Rice University
John Foxe and the Erotics of Historiography
One month

Western History Association – Martin Ridge
William Cowan, Doctoral Candidate, University of Southern California
The Pacific Slope Superstorms of 1861-1862
One month

Huntington Fellow in Mormon History
J.B. Haws, Associate Professor, Brigham Young University
The History of Latter-Day Saint History Since 1982
One month

Corpus Christi College Exchange Fellows

From Corpus Christi:
Alice Raw, Doctoral Candidate, Oxford University
Discourses of Active Female Desire in Later Medieval England, 1300-1550

To Corpus Christi:
Nicole Sheriko, Doctoral Candidate, Rutgers University
Performing Popular Culture: Puppets, Clowns, and Animals in Early Modern England

Durham University Exchange Fellows

From Durham:
Matthew Eddy, Professor, Durham University
Student Notebooks as Artefacts of the Scottish Enlightenment

To Durham:
Freddy Dominguez, Assistant Professor, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville
Spanish Elizabethan Books: Exile, Politics, and Print during the Wars of Religion

Linacre College Exchange Fellows

From Linacre:
Vincent Roy-Di Piazza, Doctoral Candidate, University of Oxford
Swedenborg in California: Historiography of Swedenborgian Literature and Collections at the Huntington Library

To Linacre:
Leigh-Michil George, Lecturer, University of California, Los Angeles
Sentimental Laughter: Caricature, Jestbooks, and the Novel, 1740-1840

Lincoln College Exchange Fellows

From Lincoln:
Paul Stephens, Doctoral Candidate, University of Oxford
P. B. Shelley and the Economic Imagination

To Lincoln:
Bruce Hindmarsh, Professor, Regent College, University of British Columbia
The Diaries and Autobiographical Accounts of George Whitefield

New College Exchange Fellows

From New:
Katie McKeogh, Fellow, Oxford University
Gentleman Scholars: Catholicism and Antiquarianism, 1560-1660

To New:
Tita Chico, Associate Professor, University of Maryland, College Park
Technologies of Wonder in an Age of Enlightenment

Trinity College Dublin Exchange Fellows

From Trinity College Dublin:
Tom Walker, Professor, Trinity College Dublin
Yeats and the Writing of Art

To Trinity College Dublin:
Chulki Kim, Doctoral Candidate, SUNY Binghamton
An Imperial Pendulum: Ideas and Politics in the Making of the British-Irish Union, 1750-1801

Trinity Hall Exchange Fellows

From Trinity Hall:
George Morris, Doctoral Candidate, University of Cambridge
Intimacy and Psychic Research, 1889-1913

To Trinity Hall:
Jeremy Specland, Doctoral Candidate, Rutgers University
Psalm Reading at the Lyric Sequence in Early Modern England

Travel Grants to the United Kingdom

Mara Caden, Fellow, Massachusetts Historical Society
Mint Conditions: The Politics and Geography of Money in Britain and its Empire, 1650-1760

Soren Hammerschmidt, Adjunct Faculty, Arizona State University
Modular Pope: Portraits, Poems, and Recycled Print

Alexey Krichtal, Doctoral Candidate, Johns Hopkins University
Liverpool, Slavery, and the Atlantic Cotton Frontier, 1763-1833

Bryan Rindfleisch, Assistant Professor, Marquette University
From Creek (Mvskoke) to Cherokee (Tsalagi): The Entangled Histories of Native America, 1600-1800

Sarah Rodriguez, Assistant Professor, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville
“Children of the Great Mexican Family”: Anglo American Immigration to Mexico and the Making of the United States Empire, 1820-1867

Asheesh Siddique, Fellow, Pennsylvania State University
Rule Through Paper: Archive and Language in the Governance of the British Empire

AHRC-Huntington Fellows

Gabriella Beckhurst, Doctoral Candidate, University of York
Eco-Tour: The Role of Modern Print Culture in American Environmental Reform
Three months

Alice Blow, Doctoral Candidate, University of Cambridge
Cross-Dressing in Early Modern Print
Three months

Vincent Chabany-Douarre, Doctoral Candidate, Kings College London
Assessing Suburban Life in Midcentury Los Angeles: Urban Policy, Western Promotion, and Women's History
Five months

William Clayton, Doctoral Candidate, University of East Anglia
Print and Radicalism: The Production, Distribution and Reception of Radical Texts in England, c.1630-1660
Three months

Sarah French, Doctoral Candidate, University of Sussex
Doings of the Sunbeam: Reintroducing Photography with the Ethnographic Collections of Annie, Lady Brassey (1839-1887)
Three months

Kate Meakin, Doctoral Candidate, University of Sussex
Investigating the intersections between feminist dystopian fiction and activist narratives in the work of Octavia E. Butler
Three months

Emily Rowe, Doctoral Candidate, Newcastle University
'Words are but the images of matter': The materiality of language in early modern England
Three months

Hannah Yip, Doctoral Candidate, University of Birmingham
Visual Elements of English Printed Sermons, c. 1540 - c. 1660: Reading, Religious Politics, and Iconography
Three months

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