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Posted on Oct. 16, 2019 by Bill Brown
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In the summer of 1919, from the pages of the Oakland Tribune, Professor Albert Porta predicted a "terrific weather cataclysm" for December 17—an event that would end the world ...

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Aug. 2, 2017
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Home to gorgeous gardens, spectacular art, and stunning rare books and manuscripts, The Huntington also offers an impressive slate of lectures and conferences on topics and themes related to its collections...
Jul. 26, 2017 by Natalie Russell
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Summer is a time for enjoying the great outdoors, and what better way than by hiking and camping? That’s as true today as it was more than a century ago, when one remarkable woman embarked on a 10-day...
Jul. 19, 2017 by Adam Bridgen
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Most of us have little experience of being thrown out of a garden. When I’ve been found wandering through The Huntington’s orange groves (usually off-limits to visitors), at worst I’m asked by one...
Jul. 12, 2017 by Linda Chiavaroli
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The Lily Ponds, among the first garden features developed at The Huntington, are at their seasonal peak now...
Jul. 6, 2017 by Thea Page
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You might skip right past it. In a room of the Jonathan and Karin Fielding Wing dominated by kaleidoscopic starbursts...
Jun. 29, 2017 by Kevin Durkin
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Earlier this week, The Huntington announced “COLLECTION/S: WCCW/five at The Huntington,”...
Jun. 22, 2017 by Ayana Jamieson
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The papers of award-winning science fiction writer Octavia E. Butler (1947–2006) came to The Huntington in 2008. By the time the collection had been processed and cataloged, more than 40 scholars had...
Jun. 14, 2017 by Tawrin Baker
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As a historian of science, I’m fascinated with pictures that help make sense of past scientific ideas and practices. The Huntington’s vast collection of rare 16th-century science books document how...
Jun. 7, 2017 by Diana W. Thompson
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Who will be the civic leaders of tomorrow and guide the decisions Los Angeles makes about infrastructure, transportation, homelessness, and other major issues? It may just be some of the high school juniors...
May. 31, 2017 by Suzanne Oatey
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Patent papers. Drawings of railcars. Engineering notes. Photographs of trains and machine shops. These were the kinds of materials I expected to encounter as I began organizing
May. 24, 2017 by Gayle Richardson
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Imagine my surprise when I read the following words in the acknowledgment section of Elizabeth Jane Howard: A Dangerous Innocence...
May. 17, 2017 by Steve Hindle
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As acting president of The Huntington, I am having the great pleasure of immersing myself in the wide-ranging activities that take place in this extraordinary institution. Our exhibitions program is chief...
May. 11, 2017 by Sophie Coulombeau
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The last decade has seen a surge of interest in historical fiction. Led by Hilary Mantel’s Wolf Hall and Bring Up the Bodies—novels that chronicle the rise to power of Thomas Cromwell (1485–1540)...
May. 8, 2017 by Tom Smith
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One of the greatest joys for historians doing archival research is the opportunity to become lost in someone else’s world. I had this experience during my recent fellowship at The Huntington as I delved...
May. 3, 2017 by Chip Long
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Early in his life, the celebrated British writer Evelyn Waugh (1903–1966) thought he’d make furniture for a living; he also studied art. While he ultimately abandoned those paths, his desire to make...
Apr. 27, 2017 by Diana W. Thompson
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As you stroll through the Frances and Sidney Brody California Garden, you may find it hard to believe...
Apr. 24, 2017 by Kristi Westberg
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Five hundred years before government officials in some countries got in the business of censoring Instagram feeds or Twitter accounts, the Roman Catholic Church was using ink to black out text that it...
Apr. 21, 2017 by Diana W. Thompson
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For Kyoto-based landscape designer Takuhiro Yamada, the tea garden he designed in The Huntington’s Japanese...
Apr. 19, 2017
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Home to gorgeous gardens, spectacular art, and stunning rare books and manuscripts, The Huntington also offers an impressive slate of lectures and conferences on topics and themes related to its collections...
Apr. 17, 2017 by Kevin Durkin
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In June 2016, The Huntington launched a crowdsourcing project called “Decoding the Civil War” to transcribe and decipher a collection of 15,922 U.S. Civil War telegrams between Abraham Lincoln, his...