Author Archives: Susan Turner-Lowe

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Posted on Jul. 14, 2016 by Susan Turner-Lowe
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One of the remarkable and exciting things about The Huntington—aside from its glorious collections—is its relative lack of bureaucracy and as a result its ability to move quickly. We are in a word...
Posted on Mar. 30, 2016 by Susan Turner-Lowe
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The first time I walked into the office of Laurie Sowd, The Huntington's vice president for operations, I thought I was in the wrong place. This was the person in charge of multimillion dollar construction...
Posted on Jun. 25, 2015 by Susan Turner-Lowe
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On June 30 an era draws to a close at The Huntington as President Steve Koblik steps up to his well-deserved retirement. Before we turn the page to the next chapter in our history Susan Turner-Lowe...
Posted on Jun. 12, 2015 by Susan Turner-Lowe
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The botanical world is full of surprises, as any of the thousands of people who've visited the Amorphophallus titanum in bloom might tell you. Wild sizes, outrageous colors, complex patterns, otherworldly...
Posted on Nov. 14, 2014 by Susan Turner-Lowe
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One of the great things about working at The Huntington is that we're surrounded by all this cool stuff: on any one day, we can walk outside and see roses, orchids, cycads, bonsai, penjing and puyas ...
Posted on Aug. 27, 2014 by Susan Turner-Lowe
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Every now and then a coworker comes along who is absolutely made for the job. They live it, breathe it, are the essence of the work—so much so that you think the job is them. In fact, you don't know...
Posted on Aug. 7, 2014 by Susan Turner-Lowe
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Since the opening of The Huntington's exhibition of spectacular World War I posters in the West Hall of the Library, we've taken note of a very different and sobering depiction of World War I currently...
Posted on Apr. 8, 2014 by Susan Turner-Lowe
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Most people know the Rubik's Cube, that colorful handful of plastic that has fascinated and frustrated many a puzzle aficionado over the past 40 years. But have you heard of the stomachion? It's a puzzle...
Posted on Dec. 5, 2013 by Susan Turner-Lowe
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Posted on Oct. 11, 2013 by Susan Turner-Lowe
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You may recall a curious story about lost-and-found art that ran in The New York Times last year—a news piece that explained how a long overlooked monumental sculpture of celebrated artist Sargent Claude...
Posted on Aug. 15, 2013 by Susan Turner-Lowe
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On the 300th anniversary of the birth of Junípero Serra comes a new biography certain to shift the discourse about Serra's role in the shaping of California history and the contested legacies of his work...
Posted on Nov. 15, 2012 by Susan Turner-Lowe
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"Maynard L. Parker (1900–1976) built a career making residential spaces look their alluring best," says Jennifer A. Watts on the jacket copy of the new book that she edited about the acclaimed architectural...
Posted on May. 17, 2012 by Susan Turner-Lowe
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Every now and then, something serendipitous happens and, after all is said and done, you can't help but sit back and marvel a bit. So it happened with a lovely little conversation that turned into a full-blown...
Posted on Jun. 17, 2011 by Susan Turner-Lowe
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In its final week, "Three Fragments of a Lost Tale: Sculpture and Story by John Frame" continues to make headlines. KPCC is rebroadcasting reporter John Rabe's interview with the artist, and the LA Weekly...
Posted on May. 11, 2011 by Susan Turner-Lowe
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NPR's Joe Palca spent the summer of 2009 at The Huntington on a fellowship as science writer in residence. The result? His new book, Annoying: The Science of What Bugs Us. (And we're trying not to take...
Posted on May. 2, 2011 by Susan Turner-Lowe
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The haunting, soulful tone that underscores the John Frame exhibition "Three Fragments of a Lost Tale: Sculpture and Story by John Frame" is set in large part by the characters' eyes. Certainly the dark...
Posted on Mar. 10, 2011 by Susan Turner-Lowe
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For months now, we have been looking forward to an unusual exhibition—a display of works created by the Southern California sculptor John Frame. For the better part of five years, Frame has been assembling...
Posted on Oct. 8, 2010 by Susan Turner-Lowe
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"She is a joy. I look at her and light goes all through me." Quick quiz. Who wrote it? William Carlos Williams? Wallace Stevens? Alice Walker? None of the above? That's right, none of the above.  ...

Recent Posts

Aug. 16, 2022 by Sandy Masuo
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Gasteria species were included in the genus Aloe until 1809, when French physician and botanist Henri August Duval proposed they be moved into the new genus Gasteria, named for the slightly bulbous, stomach-like...
Jul. 26, 2022 by Sandy Masuo
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When you step into The Rose Hills Foundation Conservatory for Botanical Science at The Huntington, you are instantly transported to another world. Consistently warm and humid conditions create a pocket...
Jul. 19, 2022 by Vanessa Wilkie
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In 1736, just four days before Christmas, 5-year-old Mary “Molly” Leigh wrote a formal letter to her father, Theophilus Leigh, Master of Balliol College, Oxford. The first page of the letter is ruled...

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