Author Archives: Olga Tsapina

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Posted on Jun. 23, 2021 by Olga Tsapina
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In March 1852, Charles Devens, the United States Marshal for Massachusetts, submitted an expense report ...
Posted on Feb. 10, 2021 by Olga Tsapina
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On April 8, 1777, John Adams, the future second president of the United States, wrote a letter to "Mr. John Quincy Adams," his eldest son and the future sixth president ...
Posted on Jun. 17, 2020 by Olga Tsapina
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Last December, The Huntington announced that it had acquired the historical manuscript collection assembled by L. Dennis Shapiro ...
Posted on Mar. 27, 2019 by Olga Tsapina
6 Comment(s)
In the spring of 1838, Henry Meigs (1782–1861)—a veteran of the War of 1812, former U.S. Representative, and a successful lawyer—discovered that he was sharing his house ...
Posted on Oct. 30, 2018 by Olga Tsapina
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Few documents of the Founding era were more admired in the United States before the Civil War than George Washington's Farewell Address. Americans liked to think of themselves as the same nation to which...
Posted on Mar. 21, 2018 by Olga Tsapina
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On August 26, 1852, Charles Sumner (1811–1874), the junior Senator from Massachusetts, took the floor of the United States Senate to deliver a major speech against slavery. For three hours, Sumner blasted...
Posted on Feb. 20, 2017 by Olga Tsapina
2 Comment(s)
By the time of his death on Feb. 20, 1895, Frederick Douglass had become one of the most celebrated personalities in the United States. Born a slave in Maryland around 1818, he escaped to New York in...
Posted on Nov. 3, 2016 by Olga Tsapina
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The sight of an old account ledger doesn’t generally excite many people—aside from historians and forensic accountants. But a ledger that once belonged to the famous American feminist and social...
Posted on Mar. 3, 2014 by Olga Tsapina
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A war is seldom thought of as a sightseeing opportunity. Yet for many young men, the Civil War offered a chance to see places they had only read about in books. One such book was Solomon Northup’s Twelve...
Posted on Feb. 21, 2014 by Olga Tsapina
1 Comment(s)

One of the greatest perks of a manuscript curator's job is meeting, in a manner of speaking, the nicest people who are no longer with us. I guess this is why we look at the...

Posted on Nov. 6, 2012 by Olga Tsapina
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Today we bring you the second part of a post by Olga Tsapina, the Norris Foundation Curator of American Historical Manuscripts and curator of the current exhibition
Posted on Nov. 5, 2012 by Olga Tsapina
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Today and tomorrow we bring you a two-part piece by Olga Tsapina, the Norris Foundation Curator of American Historical Manuscripts and curator of the current exhibition

Recent Posts

Aug. 10, 2021 by Sean Lahmeyer
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Soon after Henry E. Huntington purchased the San Marino Ranch (formerly owned by James DeBarth Shorb) in 1903, he learned that many agricultural crops—such as avocados, peaches, and nuts—could be grown...
Jul. 28, 2021 by Manuela Gomez Rhine
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Several of the objects on display in the upcoming exhibition, “What Now: Collecting for the Library in the 21st Century, Part 2,” provide windows into The Huntington’s array of collections that support...
Jul. 7, 2021 by Sara K. Austin
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What sparks the lightning bolt of insight? How do we come to see with new eyes? Literature can expose us to perspectives strange to us, but our interpretations can also be clouded by familiarity ...

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