Author Archives: Olga Tsapina

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Posted on Feb. 17, 2022 by Olga Tsapina
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In 1968, the third Monday of February was designated Presidents Day—a U.S. national holiday celebrating all presidents, past and present. The choice of the date was tied to Feb. 22, George Washington’s...
Posted on Jun. 23, 2021 by Olga Tsapina
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In March 1852, Charles Devens, the United States Marshal for Massachusetts, submitted an expense report ...
Posted on Feb. 10, 2021 by Olga Tsapina
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On April 8, 1777, John Adams, the future second president of the United States, wrote a letter to "Mr. John Quincy Adams," his eldest son and the future sixth president ...
Posted on Jun. 17, 2020 by Olga Tsapina
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Last December, The Huntington announced that it had acquired the historical manuscript collection assembled by L. Dennis Shapiro ...
Posted on Mar. 27, 2019 by Olga Tsapina
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In the spring of 1838, Henry Meigs (1782–1861)—a veteran of the War of 1812, former U.S. Representative, and a successful lawyer—discovered that he was sharing his house ...
Posted on Oct. 30, 2018 by Olga Tsapina
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Few documents of the Founding era were more admired in the United States before the Civil War than George Washington's Farewell Address. Americans liked to think of themselves as the same nation to which...
Posted on Mar. 21, 2018 by Olga Tsapina
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On August 26, 1852, Charles Sumner (1811–1874), the junior Senator from Massachusetts, took the floor of the United States Senate to deliver a major speech against slavery. For three hours, Sumner blasted...
Posted on Feb. 20, 2017 by Olga Tsapina
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Posted on Nov. 3, 2016 by Olga Tsapina
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The sight of an old account ledger doesn't generally excite many people—aside from historians and forensic accountants. But a ledger that once belonged to the famous American feminist and social reformer...
Posted on Mar. 3, 2014 by Olga Tsapina
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A war is seldom thought of as a sightseeing opportunity. Yet for many young men, the Civil War offered a chance to see places they had only read about in books. One such book was Solomon Northup's Twelve...
Posted on Feb. 21, 2014 by Olga Tsapina
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One of the greatest perks of a manuscript curator's job is meeting, in a manner of speaking, the nicest people who are no longer with us. I guess this is why we look at the past with such nostalgia: Much...
Posted on Nov. 6, 2012 by Olga Tsapina
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Today we bring you the second part of a post by Olga Tsapina, the Norris Foundation Curator of American Historical Manuscripts and curator of the current exhibition "A Just Cause: Voices of the American...
Posted on Nov. 5, 2012 by Olga Tsapina
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Today and tomorrow we bring you a two-part piece by Olga Tsapina, the Norris Foundation Curator of American Historical Manuscripts and curator of the current exhibition "A Just Cause: Voices of the American...

Recent Posts

Jun. 28, 2022 by Sandy Masuo
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In arid 21st-century California, April arrives at the tail end of the rainy season, which concluded this year with a water shortage emergency announcement. By the time state officials released the statement...
Jun. 21, 2022 by Steve Hindle
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June is a wonderful time of year at The Huntington: The flowers are in bloom, the gardens and galleries are bustling with visitors, and a fresh cohort of scholars are once again poring over our world-class...
Jun. 14, 2022 by Linde B. Lehtinen and Dennis Carr
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A woman lies naked on the ground, warmed by the sun. The organic lines of her body echo the color and curves of the stone beneath her, and she seems to merge with her environment. The central image is...

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