Verso

Posted on Jun. 3, 2020 by Kevin Durkin
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When The Huntington closed nearly three months ago due to a global pandemic some employees whose work was on hiatus because of diminished activities received work reassignments. We asked one of them...

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Jan. 25, 2013 by Brandon Tam
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Mimosas all around! No, not the one you drink! The Mimosa I'm talking about is Mimosa pudica, "The Sensitive Plant" that is growing in The Rose Hills Foundation Conservatory for Botanical Science. Some...
Jan. 20, 2013 by Matt Stevens
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Today Barack Obama will be sworn in for his second term as president of the United States although the public ceremony and inaugural speech won't take place until Monday In today’s New York Times...
Jan. 18, 2013 by Matt Stevens
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This Sunday at 5 p.m., PBS SoCal will air the documentary “The Passion and Politics of Ed Edelman: An Untold Story...
Jan. 17, 2013 by Dylan P. Hannon
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In 2002, a roadside orchid stand in the Peruvian countryside was the opening scene of one of the most infamous chapters in the history of orchidology. An American orchid collector, Michael Kovach, brought...
Jan. 11, 2013 by Matt Stevens
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You have just a few more days to see the exhibition “A Strange and Fearful Interest: Death Mourning...
Jan. 8, 2013 by Katheryn Venturelli
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If you happen to be strolling through Liu Fang Yuan—The Huntington’s Garden of Flowing Fragrance—on a Wednesday afternoon, you will likely encounter a performer of traditional Chinese music. In...
Dec. 30, 2012 by Matt Stevens
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We’ve covered a lot of memorable stories on Verso this year, but The Huntington also got a fair amount of coverage in other outlets—from the Los Angeles Times to the Wall Street Journal, from KPCC’s...
Dec. 28, 2012 by Kate Lain
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The week leading up to that day when we swap out the old calendar for the new is always a favorite for taking stock of all that has happened—from the mundane to the milestone—over the past 12 months...
Dec. 26, 2012 by Laura Voisin
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It wasn’t an “Aha!” moment but rather one of the many “Hmmm” moments most scholars come across on a daily basis. And this one was dated Dec. 26, 1795 A couple years ago, in Huntington Frontiers...
Dec. 21, 2012 by Brandon Tam
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Astronomers throughout history have searched the skies in hopes of locating the Star of Bethlehem, the famed star of scripture. Meanwhile botanists have found their very own “Star of Bethlehem” among...
Dec. 19, 2012 by Matt Stevens
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This publishing season, books on the American Revolution and Founding Fathers have garnered

Dec. 16, 2012 by Catherine Wehrey
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“What you are, you are by accident of birth; what I am, I am by myself.” The baptismal certificate of Ludwig van Beethoven is dated Dec. 17, 1770. Since custom dictated that families not wait longer...
Dec. 13, 2012 by Shelley Kresan
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Another post in a series from the cataloger of the Anne M. Cranston cookbook collection which consists of approximately 4400 British and American cookbooks from the 19th and 20th centuries. In this series...
Dec. 7, 2012 by Brandon Tam
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Finding a rare and endangered plant species in the wild is hard enough. What is even more difficult is spotting an albino form of that flower! By definition, albinism is the absence of any pigmentation...
Dec. 6, 2012 by Shelley Kresan
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With this post we introduce a new Verso series from Shelley Kresan, one of the rare book catalogers in the Library. She is in the process of cataloging the Anne M. Cranston cookbook collection, which consists...
Dec. 4, 2012 by Kate Lain
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Heavy boxes of glass. A portable darkroom. Noxious chemicals. A cumbersome camera. Field photography during the U.S. Civil War was an arduous process far removed from the relatively effortless digital...