Verso

Posted on Nov. 20, 2019 by Linda Chiavaroli
0 Comment(s)
"What Now: Collecting for the Library in the 21st Century," Part 1, in the Library's West Hall through February 17, offers what co-curator Claudia Funke calls "a tantalizing glimpse of The Huntington's...

Search Verso

 
Apr. 25, 2018 by Linda Chiavaroli
0 Comment(s)
E.L. Trouvelot made one big mistake in his life: releasing, by accident, gypsy moths he was studying into the woods near his home in Medford, Massachusetts in the 1860s. This error, which had dire consequences...
Apr. 18, 2018 by Kevin Durkin
0 Comment(s)
Home to gorgeous gardens, spectacular art, and stunning rare books and manuscripts, The Huntington also offers an impressive slate of lectures and conferences on topics and themes related to its collections...
Apr. 11, 2018 by Manuela Gomez
1 Comment(s)
A group of Herb Garden docents gathered in the Botanical Center’s headhouse one recent morning to begin work on a textile installation piece they plan to display at the upcoming
Apr. 4, 2018 by Catherine Bates
2 Comment(s)
Shakespeare’s Sonnets are enduringly popular. Many people recognize famous lines from the sequence or even know some of the sonnets by heart. Even though the first edition, published in 1609, was not...
Mar. 28, 2018 by Daniel K.
0 Comment(s)
John Ogilby was born in Scotland in 1600, died in London in 1676, and was, at various points in between, a dancing master, a theatrical impresario, a translator of Virgil and Homer, and a widely read...
Mar. 21, 2018 by Olga Tsapina
3 Comment(s)
On August 26, 1852, Charles Sumner (1811–1874), the junior Senator from Massachusetts, took the floor of the United States Senate to deliver a major speech against slavery. For three hours, Sumner blasted...
Mar. 14, 2018 by Linda Chiavaroli
0 Comment(s)
The concept for the book Civil Wars: A History in Ideas, David Armitage’s examination...
Mar. 7, 2018 by Natalie Russell
0 Comment(s)
Haiku is arguably the best-known form of poetry in the United States. But how did this distinctly Japanese art form first come to the States? ...
Feb. 28, 2018 by Anna Marie
1 Comment(s)
Martin Folkes was perhaps the best-connected and most versatile natural philosopher and antiquary of his age, an epitome of Enlightenment sociability, yet he is today a surprisingly neglected figure ...
Feb. 21, 2018 by Catherine Hess
7 Comment(s)
Here, Edward Burne-Jones painted a cave in the background, creating a sense of protection and quiet piety that contrasts with the decorative brilliance above ...
Feb. 15, 2018 by Manuela Gomez
0 Comment(s)
Before Phillip E. Bloom applied to become The Huntington's Curator of the Chinese Garden, he spent two days exploring and contemplating Liu Fang Yuan, the Garden of Flowing Fragrance—first alone and...
Feb. 7, 2018 by Kevin Durkin
0 Comment(s)
When Akira Chiba, the consul general of Japan in Los Angeles, came to visit The Huntington, he had an opportunity to look at one of the Library’s recent acquisitions—a guest book that contains the...
Jan. 31, 2018 by Melinda McCurdy
1 Comment(s)
What do a zebra and a musical genius have in common? In the case of George Stubbs’ painting Zebra and Thomas...
Jan. 24, 2018 by John N.
5 Comment(s)
As The Huntington’s curator of desert collections, I, along with my staff, care for 2,000 species of succulents, including a vast range of cacti, in the 10-acre
Jan. 17, 2018 by Melinda McCurdy
1 Comment(s)
Have you ever found yourself fascinated by the intricate shapes and features of plants, or even taken the time to draw or photograph a beautiful flower that caught your eye? In the exhibition “
Jan. 10, 2018 by David OShaughnessy
0 Comment(s)
I am convening a conference at The Huntington titled “The...