Media Archives

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peasants
Government and Family Life: The Unintended Consequences of the English Poor Relief System, 1660–1780
Nov. 14, 2018

Naomi Tadmor, professor of history at the University of Lancaster and the Fletcher Jones Foundation Distinguished Fellow at The Huntington, discusses the sophisticated system of social welfare developed in 17th- and 18th-century England aimed to assist the poor and its impact on local government and the lives of families and communities.

 

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Observatories
Carnegie Lecture Series: Simulating the Universe, One Galaxy at a Time
Apr. 17, 2017

Andrew Wetzel discusses how theoretical astrophysics is now revealing how galaxies are formed, using the world's most powerful supercomputers to simulate this complex process.

 
potosi
Potosí, Silver, and the Coming of the Modern World
Apr. 12, 2017

John Demos, Samuel Knight Professor Emeritus of History at Yale University and the Ritchie Distinguished Fellow at The Huntington, presents an account of Potosí, the great South American silver mine and boomtown that galvanized imperial Spain in the 16th and 17th centuries, fueled the rise of capitalism, destroyed native peoples and cultures en masse, and changed history—for good or ill?

 
Investigating an Artifact
DO NOT OPEN! Investigating an Artifact from The Huntington’s Vault
Apr. 11, 2017

The Huntington has the only known recording of Joseph H. Hazelton's eyewitness account of the assassination of Abraham Lincoln. Aric Allen documents the story of this strange artifact.

 
Exploding stars
Carnegie Lecture Series: Unraveling the Mysteries of Exploding Stars
Apr. 3, 2017

Tony Piro discusses how scientists are combining observations with theoretical modeling to unravel the mysteries of supernovae.

 
vintage recipe
A Recipe is More than a Recipe
Mar. 29, 2017

Drawing on The Huntington's Anne M. Cranston American Regional and Charitable Cookbook Collection, food writer Patric Kuh discusses what these shared recipes can tell us, not just about food and community but about the changes that shaped the way Americans cook.

 
marsh house
Framing a New Elegance: The World of George T. Marsh and His Japanese House
Mar. 28, 2017

Originally conceived by art dealer George T. Marsh as an exotic setting in which to sell curiosities, the building that in 1912 became The Huntington's Japanese House is a beautiful remnant of a transformational moment in design history. Art historian Hannah Sigur puts Marsh and his house in context, discussing the factors that helped make Japanese aesthetics the basis of good taste at the turn of the 20th century.

 
Huang Ruo and Qian Yi
Huang Ruo and Qian Yi
Mar. 24, 2017

Composer Huang Ruo, the 2017 Cheng Family Visiting Artist at The Huntington, is joined by the acclaimed kun opera singer Qian Yi for an evening of discussion and performance. Together they explore the Chinese kun opera tradition and how Huang uses the form in his contemporary compositions.

 
kate sessions
Kate Sessions: A Legacy of Botanical Bounty
Mar. 20, 2017

Landscape historian Nancy Carol Carter examines the horticultural legacy of Kate Sessions (1857–1940), the pioneering nursery owner and garden designer who left an indelible mark on the Southern California landscape. Best known for her work in San Diego, Sessions is credited with introducing and popularizing many of the beloved tree species in the region. The lecture is presented in collaboration with the California Garden and Landscape History Society.

 
excavating book
Excavating the Book
Mar. 20, 2017

Stephen Orgel, J. E. Reynolds Professor in Humanities at Stanford University, discusses books and their marketing throughout history, emphasizing the ways in which books are embedded in history, and how literary interpretation is at least partly a form of archaeology. This talk is part of the Zamorano Lecture series at The Huntington.

 
Sandy Rower
Alexander Calder’s Jerusalem Stabile at The Huntington
Mar. 18, 2017

Sandy Rower, President of the Calder Foundation, discusses the process and creation of Alexander Calder's last signed stabile. The stabile was lent to The Huntington in 2015.

 
19th century Chinese worker
The Chinese Question: The Gold Rushes and Global Politics
Mar. 15, 2017

Mae Ngai discusses the role of Chinese miners in the 19th-century gold rushes of California, Australia, and South Africa, and the rise of anti-Chinese politics in the West.

 
three estates
A Satire of the Three Estates: Renaissance Scotland’s Best Kept Secret?
Mar. 2, 2017

Greg Walker, Regius Professor of English Literature at the University of Edinburgh, discusses Sir David Lyndsay's remarkable play, "A Satire of the Three Estates", probably the most dramatically and politically radical piece of theater produced in 16th-century Britain.

 
David Zeidberg
Founder's Day Lecture
Feb. 23, 2017

David Zeidberg, who retires in June after 21 years as director of the Library, will look back on some of the many highlights of his career in the annual Founder's Day lecture.

 
LA fronter
“The Theater of Many Deeds of Blood”: The Geography of Violence in Frontier Los Angeles
Feb. 9, 2017

John Mack Faragher, the Howard R. Lamar Professor Emeritus of History and American Studies at Yale University, discusses the spatial pattern of homicide in Southern California in the 19th centuryJohn Mack Faragher, the Howard R. Lamar Professor Emeritus of History and American Studies at Yale University, discusses the spatial pattern of homicide in Southern California in the 19th centuryJohn Mack Faragher, the Howard R. Lamar Professor Emeritus of History and American Studies at Yale University, discusses the spatial pattern of homicide in Southern California in the 19th century.

 
religious affection
CONFERENCE | Religious Affections in Colonial North America
Feb. 2, 2017

What are "religious affections" and how have they influenced individuals, communities, and cultures? Leading experts in history, literature, and religious studies explore how religion shaped the roots, limits, and consequences of affections in the diverse terrain of early America.

 
exoticum
Exoticum: Desert Plants and the Making of a Fine Press Book
Feb. 2, 2017

Printmaker and book artist Richard Wagener discusses how the visually striking plants in The Huntington's Desert Garden have inspired his recent work. A series of his wood engravings are reproduced in a new limited edition, fine-press publication titled Exoticum: Twenty-five Desert Plants from the Huntington Gardens.

 
huang ruo
An Evening with Huang Ruo
Feb. 2, 2017

Composer Huang Ruo, the 2017 Cheng Family Visiting Artist at The Huntington, discusses his work, introduces Chinese opera types, and explains how he uses Chinese opera in the contemporary context. The program is the first in a series of three public presentations given by Huang during his residency.

 
colonial dreams
Colonial Dreams: A French Botanist’s Encounter with Africa in the 1750s
Jan. 28, 2017

Mary Terrall, professor of the history of science at UCLA, discusses French botanist Michel Adanson, who spent almost five years in Senegal in the 1750s. Terrall reconstructs Adanson's sojourn in a French trading post, where he studied African natural history with the help of local residents.

 
colonial dreams
Colonial Dreams: A French Botanist’s Encounter with Africa in the 1750s
Jan. 28, 2017

Mary Terrall, professor of the history of science at UCLA, discusses French botanist Michel Adanson, who spent almost five years in Senegal in the 1750s. Terrall reconstructs Adanson's sojourn in a French trading post, where he studied African natural history with the help of local residents.

 
Diavolo
Diavolo Dance: Fluid Infinities
Jan. 26, 2017

The acclaimed dance company Diavolo brings its performance of Fluid Infinities to The Huntington. Set on an abstract dome structure to the music of Phillip Glass, the work explores metaphors of infinite space, continuous movement, and mankind's voyage into the unknown.

 
mercy street
PBS’s “Mercy Street” and Medical Histories of the Civil War
Jan. 23, 2017

The Huntington presents a fascinating conversation about the practice of medicine during the U.S. Civil War and its dramatization in the popular PBS series "Mercy Street." The panel discussion is moderated by Melissa Lo, Dibner Assistant Curator or Science and Technology at The Huntington, and includes curator Olga Tsapina, who oversees The Huntington's Civil War collections; series executive producers Lisa Wolfinger and David Zabel; and series medical history advisor Shauna Devine.

 
hammersley swatch
Frederick Hammersley's Remarkable Account of his Painting Practice & Materials
Jan. 18, 2017

Abstract artist Frederick Hammersley (1919-2009) kept meticulous documentation of his painting process and materials. His Painting Books, compiled over the course of nearly 40 years, describe in detail the creation of hundreds of individual works. Scientist Alan Phenix of the Getty Conservation Institute will survey the technical content of the Painting Books, with particular focus on matters that have significance for the care and conservation of Hammersley's works.

 
Patents
The Value of Patents: A Historian’s Perspective
Jan. 13, 2017

Naomi R. Lamoreaux, Stanley B. Resor Professor of Economics and History at Yale University, discusses the important ways in which patents have contributed to technological innovation over the course of U.S. history.

 
Atlantic slave trade
The Atlantic Slave Trade and the American Revolution
Jan. 13, 2017

Christopher Brown, professor of history at Columbia University, explores the relationship between the Atlantic slave trade and the American Revolution, two themes that are usually treated separately.

 
aerospace
Panel Discussion: Aerospace in Southern California
Dec. 16, 2016

The history of the aerospace industry in Southern California and its intersections with contemporary culture are the focus of this panel discussion, presented in conjunction with the exhibition of NASA's Orbit Pavilion. Panelists are Peter Westwick, aerospace historian; William Deverell, director of the Huntington-USC Institute on California and the West; and Daniel Lewis, senior curator of the history of science and technology at The Huntington.

 
fellows jack london
You Don’t Know Jack
Dec. 13, 2016

In recognition of the centenary of Jack London's death, The Huntington's Sue Hodson, curator of literary manuscripts and former Jack London Foundation Woman of the Year, speaks about Jack London as a novelist, sailor, journalist, social activist, photographer, and adventurer, as well as about the importance of The Huntington's 50,000-item Jack London collection.

 
margo todd
Sex in the City
Dec. 9, 2016

Margo Todd, Walter H. Annenberg Professor of History at the University of Pennsylvania, examines the campaign of the mostly lay judiciaries of the Calvinist Scottish church to impose a strict and highly invasive sexual discipline on their towns in the century following the Protestant Reformation.

 
woodblock symposium
SYMPOSIUM | Word and Image: Chinese Woodblock Prints
Dec. 5, 2016

This symposium, organized in conjunction with the exhibition "Gardens, Art, and Commerce in Chinese Woodblock Prints," will explore the relationship and interaction between image and text in woodblock prints during the late Ming and Qing periods.

 
Weston photograph
Real American Places: Edward Weston and ‘Leaves of Grass’
Dec. 1, 2016

The photographs from this exhibition illuminate an understudied chapter of Weston's career. In 1941, the Limited Editions Book Club approached him to collaborate on a deluxe edition of Walt Whitman's poetry collection, "Leaves of Grass." Weston accepted the assignment and set out with his wife, Charis Wilson, on a cross-country trip that yielded a group of images that mark the culmination of an extraordinarily creative period in his career.

 
huang carvers
The Huang Family of Block Cutters: The Thread that Binds Late Ming Pictorial Woodblock Printmaking
Dec. 1, 2016

David Barker, professor of printmaking at the China National Academy of Fine Arts in Hangzhou, will consider the important contributions made to Chinese pictorial printing by the famous Huang family of artisan block cutters.