Events

Photographed by Camilla Cerea

Early Modern Ireland and the Wider World

Date: 
Fri., Apr. 8, 2022 | 8:30 a.m.–5 p.m.
Category: 
Conferences
Location: 
Rothenberg Hall
Event Notes: 
April 8–9 | Registration: $25 (Students free) | Optional lunch: $20 (each day)
Add to Calendar 04/08/2022 08:30 AM 04/08/2022 05:00 PM America/Los_Angeles Early Modern Ireland and the Wider World Visit page - https://www.huntington.org/ireland-wider-world The Huntington - Rothenberg Hall
 

This two-day in-person conference showcases recent thinking about the history of sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth-century Ireland and of Ireland’s role in the wider world.

In light of The Huntington’s extensive Irish collections, and of the creation of ‘Beyond 2022: Ireland’s Virtual Record Treasury’, speakers will discuss a range of issues including how new Irish language sources and sources written by Irish women challenge our assumptions about the early modern Irish past; how the nature of colonialism changed in Ireland from the sixteenth to the early nineteenth centuries; and how recent work on Atlantic and global history, environmental history, and the history of migration transforms our understanding of Ireland between c.1500 and 1800.

  • Registration for the 2-day conference (Fri.–Sat.) is $25 with optional lunch available for purchase each day: REGISTER
  • View safety protocols

CONFERENCE OVERVIEW

FRIDAY, APRIL 8

8:30–9:30 a.m. | Registration & Coffee

9:30–9:45 a.m. | Conference Welcome
Steve Hindle (W.M. Keck Foundation Director of Research, The Huntington)

9:45–10 a.m. | Remarks
Tim Harris (Brown University) and Jennifer Wells (George Washington University)

10 a.m.–noon | Session 1—Plantation and Expropriation
Moderator: Marie-Louise Coolahan (National University of Ireland, Galway)

  • Rory Rapple (University of Notre Dame), “Synchronous and Anachronistic Terms for Confiscation and Expropriation in Elizabethan Ireland”
  • Keith Pluymers (Illinois State University), “Indicted Weirs and the Competing Political Ecologies of Plantation Ireland”

Noon–1 p.m. | Lunch (extra charge)

1–3 p.m. | Session 2—Revolution and Violence in Ireland and Europe
Moderator: Micheál O Siochrú (Trinity College Dublin)

  • Brendan Kane (University of Connecticut), “Political Thought and Practice in ‘Revolutionary’ Ireland: the Gaelic Perspective”
  • Joan Redmond (King’s College London), “Ireland and the European Wars of Religion”

3–3:15 p.m. | Session 3—The Irish and the Wider World
Moderator: Tim Harris (Brown University)

  • Jane Ohlmeyer (Trinity College Dublin), “Ireland, Empire and the Early Modern World”
  • Marie-Louise Coolahan (National University of Ireland, Galway), “Range and Reach: Women's Writing and the Wider World”


SATURDAY, APRIL 9

9–9:30 a.m. | Registration & Coffee

9:30–11:30 a.m. | Session 4—Conquest and Colonial Projects
Moderator: Jennifer Wells (George Washington University)

  • Micheál O Siochrú (Trinity College Dublin), “Refashioning Empire: The Cromwellian Conquest and Settlement of Ireland”
  • Ted McCormick (Concordia University), “Land, Labor, and Projecting in the Seventeenth Century”

11:30–12:30 p.m. | Lunch (extra charge)

12:30–2:30 p.m. | Session 5—Restoration Ireland and the Empire
Moderator: Joan Redmond (King’s College London)

  • Tim Harris (Brown University), “Re-thinking the Restoration: British, Irish and Imperial Contexts”
  • Jennifer Wells (George Washington University), “Accidental Bureaucrats: Cromwell’s Ghost and the Irish in English Tangier”

2:30–2:45 p.m. | Break

2:45–4:45 p.m. | Session 6—Crime, Law, and the Colonial Process
Moderator: Jane Ohlmeyer (Trinity College Dublin)

  • Coleman Dennehy (University College Dublin), “Crime, Criminals, and State Reactions: Irish Law, Society, and the Colonial Process”
  • Andrew Mackillop (University of Glasgow), “Ireland and the English East India Company, c.1720-c.1820”

4:45 p.m. | Wrap-up
Tim Harris (Brown University) and Jennifer Wells (George Washington University)

Questions? Contact [email protected]


Funding provided by The Philip V. and Sara Lee Swan Endowment and The USC-Huntington Early Modern Studies Institute