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Huntington U Spring Seminars

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Four college-level seminars taught by distinguished professors get under way this spring in the Huntington U series. These six-week courses feature lectures and lively discussions, but there are no papers to write and no final test.

 

Each seminar: Members: $220. Non Members: $250.

 


The Bible as Literature, History, and Art

The Bible as Literature, History, and Art

Wednesdays, Mar. 15-Apr. 19
10 a.m.-noon

 

Explore the Bible’s impact on culture from the medieval period to the modern era. Lectures and discussions will cover topics such as illuminated manuscript Bibles, biblical drama on stage and in film, Victorian biblical illustration (and extra-illustration), and Biblical themes in literature. These topics will form the basis of our discussions as we consider the impact of the Bible on all aspects of culture: secular and popular, as well as religious. There will be weekly reading assignments from Professor Ferrell’s The Bible and the People (Yale University Press, 2008) as well as close interactions with The Huntington’s unparalleled collection of famous British and American Bibles. Register Online

 

Lori Anne Ferrell

 

Lori Anne Ferrell is professor of Early Modern History and Literature at Claremont Graduate University. Her research concentrates on the effect religious and political change had on early modern texts in the turbulent century before the outbreak of civil war in Britain.

 


The Creative Life in 19th-Century America

The Creative Life in 19th-Century America

Wednesdays, Mar. 15-Apr. 19

1-3 p.m.

 

In the decades before the Civil War, the village of Concord, Massachusetts was home to a remarkable group of American writers: Henry David Thoreau, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Louisa May Alcott, and Bronson Alcott. In this course we examine the creative lives these brilliant men and women led—from their daily creative practices and routines; to their struggles as writers; to their ongoing efforts to balance solitude and society; to their successful creation of artistic communities. We will especially look at the ways in which their own decisions and practices might serve as inspiration today. In addition to short lectures, the course will include selections from the diaries, letters, and major works of these authors. Register Online

Alice Fahs

 

Alice Fahs is Emeritus Professor of History at the University of California, Irvine; during 2015-2016, she was the Rogers Distinguished Fellow at the Huntington Library. She is the author of The Imagined Civil War: Popular Literature of the North and South, 1861-1865; and Out on Assignment: Newspaper Women and the Making of Modern Public Space, in addition to other works.

 


George Washington

George Washington

Thursdays, Mar. 16-Apr. 20
10 a.m.-noon

 

In his eulogy of George Washington, Richard Henry Lee famously said that he was, “First in war, first in peace, and first in the hearts of his countrymen.”  Yet how did Washington become that man? How did he become the first among equals of the “founding brothers” who created the United States, and why did they believe him worthy of veneration? This course explores that question by studying Washington’s life and times. We will study what Washington was trying to do, and how he was trying to do it. Along the way, we will see how an ambitious provincial man became a revered statesman, and how a colonial Virginia planter grew to think of himself as an American citizen, and from a person who took owning slaves as a matter of course to someone who believed slavery was a stain on the American republic. Register Online

Richard Samuelson

 

Richard Samuelson is associate professor of history at California State University, San Bernardino. Some examples of his research interests include the American Revolution, Colonial America, and the Early American Republic.

 


Culture, Religion, and Politics in Jacobean Drama

CANCELED - Culture, Religion, and Politics in Jacobean Drama

Thursdays, Mar. 16-Apr. 20
1-3 p.m.

 

THIS EVENT HAS BEEN CANCELED
After the long and exhausting Anglo-Spanish war of 1584-1604, King James I (1603-1625) brought an extended period of peace, during which the economy boomed, the arts flourished and serious problems festered. This course, led by professor of History Thomas Cogswell, will explore this crucial period in English history through the reading and examination of six plays: The Knight of the Burning Pestle (Francis Beaumont, 1615), A Chaste Maid in Cheapside (Thomas Middleton 1613), Bartholomew Fair (Ben Johnson, 1614), The Witch of Edmonton (William Rowley, John Ford, Thomas Dekker, 1621), The Bondman (Philip Massinger, 1624), and A Game of Chess (Thomas Middleton, 1624).  

 

Thomas Cogswell

 

Thomas Cogswell is professor of history at University of California, Riverside. His area of specialization is early modern British history.

 

About The Huntington

The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens is a collections-based research and educational institution established in 1919 by Henry E. and Arabella Huntington. Henry Huntington, a key figure in the...

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