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THE HUNTINGTON Channel: Watch/listen to Huntington lectures, events, and conferences

Check out Huntington lectures, conferences, and events we've recorded and archived right here to watch or listen any time. 

 

 WATCH / LISTEN

hawaiian-birds_350Belonging on an Island: Birds, Extinction, and Evolution in Hawai‘i

August 16, 2018

 

Daniel Lewis, the Dibner Senior Curator of the History of Science at The Huntington, discusses his new book about the birds of Hawaii. Belonging on an Island: Birds, Extinction, and Evolution in Hawai‘i takes readers on a thousand-year journey as it explores the state’s magnificent birds, touching on topics ranging from the concept of belonging to the work of pioneering bird conservationists.

  

 


busch-garden_350Pasadena Busch Gardens: Adolphus Busch’s Early Amusement Park

July 29, 2018

 

When German brewing magnate Adolphus Busch purchased a mansion on Pasadena’s “Millionaires’ Row” in 1904, he quickly bought up some 60 additional acres stretching down to the bottom of Arroyo Seco and developed it into a lushly landscaped parl. Busch Gardens, which opened to the public in 1906, featured terraced hillsides, waterfalls and ponds, and “fairy scenes” drawn from tales of the Brothers Grimm. Local historian Ann Scheid gives a fascinating lecture about this once-famous theme park, remnants of which can still be glimpsed around the neighborhood where it once stood.

  

 


remember-reformation_350Remembering the Reformation

May 23, 2018

 

Alexandra Walsham, professor of modern history at the University of Cambridge, explores how the English Reformation was remembered, forgotten, contested, and reinvented between 1530 and 1700 and discusses the enduring legacies that these processes have left in more recent cultural memory.

  

 


Susan-Whitfield_350Silk, Slaves and Stupas

May 20, 2018

 

Author Susan Whitfield (Silk, Slaves and Stupas: Material Culture of the Silk Road) is joined by renowned theater director Peter Sellars for a fascinating conversation about the diversity of peoples and cultures that traveled the ancient trade routes of Afro-Eurasia.

  

 


Simon-Winchester_350The Search for Perfection in an Imperfect World

May 17, 2018

 

Best-selling author Simon Winchester (The Professor and the Madman; The Men Who United the States) explores the origins of “precision” and the invisible role it plays, for good or for ill, in the way we live our lives. The lecture is drawn from his new book, The Perfectionists: How Precision Engineers Created the Modern World.

  

 


The Frankenstein ChallengeThe Frankenstein Challenge

May 10, 2018

 

David Baltimore, President Emeritus and Robert Andrews Millikan Professor of Biology at the California Institute of Technology, discusses the challenge of globally controlling technology when potentially 200 different jurisdictions might be involved.

  

 


Reconstructing the Mindscape of a 17th-Century Korean Literati Garden: Garden of SeyeonjeongReconstructing the Mindscape of a 17th-Century Korean Literati Garden: Garden of Seyeonjeong

May 8, 2018

 

Art historian Katharina I-Bon Suh of the Seoul National University discusses how the Garden of Seyeonjeong's design and layout served practical purposes but also alluded to philosophical metaphors and fantastical worlds in this East Asian Garden Lecture.

  

 


Dark Energy and Cosmic SoundDark Energy and Cosmic Sound

May 7, 2018

 

Daniel Eisenstein, professor of astronomy at Harvard University and director of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III, discusses the sound waves that propagated through the Universe after the Big Bang is this Carnegie Astronomy Lecture Series.

 


ca-plants_350California Plants

May 6, 2018

 

Author Matt Ritter, professor of botany at Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo, takes readers on a visual “tour” through the state’s most iconic flora in a lecture based on his new book, California Plants.

  

 


Designing with PalmsDesigning with Palms

May 5, 2018

 

Jason Dewees discusses how the sensory appeal of palms, along with their beautiful diversity, earn them a place in well-designed gardens.

  

 


Every Picture Tells a StoryEvery Picture Tells a Story

April 25, 2018

 

Richard White uses images shot by landscape photographer Jesse White to explore California's story.

  

 


Breaking a Few Asteroids

 

Carnegie Lecture: You Can’t Make a Solar System without Breaking a Few Asteroids: The Tale of Asteroid Families

April 23, 2018

 

 

Joseph Masiero discusses how asteroid families in our Solar System are the last remnants of massive collisions that occurred as the Sun and planets were being formed.

 


Abraham Lincoln’s DiaryAbraham Lincoln’s Diary

April 19, 2018

 

Ronald White examines Lincoln's overlooked notes to himself, revealing new and surprising aspects of America's greatest president.

  

 


Garden of Solitary DelightRepresentations of the Garden of Solitary Delight (Dule yuan)

April 17, 2018

 

Carol Brash examines four different representations of the Garden of Solitary Delight (Dule yuan), built in the 11th century by scholar-official Sima Guang.

  

 


dark-universe_350

 

Carnegie Lecture: Sharing the Wonders of the Light and the Dark Universe

April 9, 2018

 

 

Marja K. Seidel, postdoctoral research associate with Carnegie Observatories, discusses her quest to understand dark matter and also shares her experiences bringing astronomy education to remote and under-served communities around the world.

 


edges-earth_350To the Edges of the Earth

April 5, 2018

 

Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Edward J. Larson discusses his new book, To the Edges of the Earth: 1909, the Race for the Three Poles, and the Climax of the Age of Exploration, and shares the story of three simultaneous and groundbreaking expeditions that pushed to the furthest reaches of the globe and brought within human reach a complete accounting of all the Earth's surface.

   

 


 

Making Art/Discovering ScienceMaking Art/Discovering Science

March 14, 2018

 

Steven Shapin, the Franklin L. Ford Research Professor of the History of Science at Harvard University, draws attention to the widely held view that artistic productions are "things made up" and scientific knowledge consists of "things found out." How stable and coherent are such presumptions? Shapin discusses examples drawn from 19th-century biology and from 20th-century and contemporary art.

  

 


Conversion & Religions of the World in 18th-Century AmericaConversion & Religions of the World in 18th-Century America

March 7, 2018

 

Mark Valeri, the Reverend Priscilla Wood Neaves Distinguished Professor of Religion and Politics at Washington University in St. Louis, describes how new ideas of moral virtue and political reasonableness shaped Protestant approaches to religious choice in colonial America.

  

 


In Search of Blue Boy’s True ColorsIn Search of Blue Boy’s True Colors

February 28, 2018

 

Kimberly Chrisman-Campbell, art historian and journalist, reveals the scholarship and science behind Project Blue Boy, The Huntington’s two-year effort to conserve one of Western Art’s greatest masterpieces in this annual Founder's Day lecture.

  

 


Chop Suey, USA: How Americans Discovered Chinese FoodChop Suey, USA: How Americans Discovered Chinese Food

February 22, 2018

 

Yong Chen, professor of history at the University of California, Irvine, discusses the historical forces that turned Chinese food, a cuisine once widely rejected by Americans, into one of the most popular ethnic foods in the U.S.

  

 


The Introduction of Japanese Plants into North AmericaThe Introduction of Japanese Plants into North America

February 20, 2018

 

Through the pioneering work of collectors and nurserymen, many new Japanese species were introduced to the American gardening public in the late 19th century. Peter Del Tredici, Senior Research Scientist, Emeritus, of the Arnold Arboretum at Harvard University, will examine the history behind these early introductions, some of which had a profound impact on both cultivated and wild landscapes across America.

  

 


Civil Wars: A History in IdeasCivil Wars: A History in Ideas

February 15, 2018

 

David Armitage, the Lloyd C. Blankfein Professor of History at Harvard University, puts contemporary conflicts from Afghanistan to Syria into historical perspective and asks why it matters whether we call them “civil wars” instead of insurgencies, rebellions, or even revolutions.

  

 


Miraculous Things: The Culture of Consumerism in the RenaissanceMiraculous Things: The Culture of Consumerism in the Renaissance

February 7, 2018

 

Martha Howell, professor of history at Columbia University and the R. Stanton Avery Distinguished Fellow, discusses the meaning attached to goods—both humble and luxurious—during the Renaissance. The era is considered by many to be the first age of commercial globalism.

  

 


Louis C. Tiffany's Glass MosaicsLouis C. Tiffany's Glass Mosaics

February 1, 2018

 

In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, Louis Comfort Tiffany directed an artistic empire in the design and creation of stained glass windows and lamps, blown glass vases, and other objects of luxury. But his innovations in glass mosaics represented perhaps his most expressive mastery of the medium. Kelly Conway, curator of American glass at the Corning Museum of Glass in Corning, New York, discusses this understudied aspect of Tiffany's virtuosity. This talk is part of the Wark Lecture Series at The Huntington.

  

 


Exhibition Talk: Live Free or DieExhibition Talk: Live Free or Die

January 27, 2018

 

Artists Soyoung Shin and Juliana Wisdom, two of the seven artists whose work is featured in the current exhibition COLLECTION/S, will discuss the influence of 18th-century French history and decorative arts on their work. The discussion is moderated by Jenny Watts, curator of photography and visual culture at The Huntington, and Catherine Hess, chief curator of European art.

  

 


Decoding the Book: Printing & the Birth of SecrecyDecoding the Book: Printing & the Birth of Secrecy

January 24, 2018

 

Bill Sherman, director of the Warburg Institute in London, delivers the inaugural annual lecture honoring David Zeidberg, recently retired Avery Director of the Library. In his presentation, Sherman traces the modern field of cryptography back to the Renaissance and asks what role the invention of printing played in the keeping of secrets. This talk is part of the Zeidberg Lecture in the History of the Book Series at The Huntington.

  

 


Portland Japanese Garden: The Journey ContinuesPortland Japanese Garden: The Journey Continues

January 23, 2018

 

For more than 50 years, the Portland Japanese Garden has been a haven of serenity and an important center for Japanese culture. Join Sadafumi Uchiyama, Garden Curator of the Portland Japanese Garden, as he reflects on their recent expansion and newly founded institute for teaching garden history, design, construction, and maintenance. This talk is part of the East Asian Garden Lecture Series at The Huntington.

  

 


Frederick Hammersley's Remarkable Account of his Painting Practice & MaterialsFrederick Hammersley's Remarkable Account of his Painting Practice & Materials

January 18, 2018

 

Abstract artist Frederick Hammersley (1919-2009) kept meticulous documentation of his painting process and materials. His Painting Books, compiled over the course of nearly 40 years, describe in detail the creation of hundreds of individual works. Scientist Alan Phenix of the Getty Conservation Institute will survey the technical content of the Painting Books, with particular focus on matters that have significance for the care and conservation of Hammersley's works.

  

 


Anton Roman: San Francisco's Pioneering Bookseller & PublisherAnton Roman: San Francisco's Pioneering Bookseller & Publisher

January 17, 2018

 

John Crichton, proprietor of the Brick Row Book Shop in San Francisco, shares the story of pioneering entrepreneur Anton Roman (1828-1903), who came to California from Bavaria in 1849 to make his fortune in the gold fields, then converted his gold into books and became one of the most important booksellers in the West. This program is the Book Club of California's inaugural Kenneth Karmiole Endowed Lecture.

  

 


CONFERENCE | Globalizing the Protestant ReformationsCONFERENCE | Globalizing the Protestant Reformations

January 16, 2018

 

This conference investigates the nature and significance of the Protestant Reformation as a global phenomenon. Leading scholars from Europe and the United States offer fresh perspectives on the dynamics of religious change by examining the roles of institutions, interpretative communities, and communications media in advancing the globalization of the Protestant faith. The conference was held at The Huntington Dec. 8–9, 2017.

  

 


A Mormon Diarist in California, 1850-1858A Mormon Diarist in California, 1850-1858

January 10, 2018

 

Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Laurel Thatcher Ulrich, the 300th Anniversary University Professor of History at Harvard University, shares stories from the remarkable diary of Caroline Crosby. The wife of a Mormon missionary, Crosby reached California with her husband in 1850 en route to a posting in the South Pacific, and later lived among "saints and strangers" in San Jose, San Francisco, and San Bernardino. This talk is part of the Mormon History Lecture Series at The Huntington.

  

 


Conversation and Readings from the Podcast Harry Potter and the Sacred TextConversation and Readings from the Podcast Harry Potter and the Sacred Text

December 21, 2017

 

Vanessa Zoltan (co-host) and Ariana Nedelman (producer) of the celebrated podcast, Harry Potter and the Sacred Text, along with Huntington curator Vanessa Wilkie, discuss how media format shapes message. The podcast team discusses why they choose to do their program as a podcast (as opposed to a reading group, blog, or book), the opportunities of this media, as well as its limitations. This program was presented in conjunction with the exhibition “The Reformation: From the Word to the World.”

  

 


Cochineal in the History of Art and Global TradeCochineal in the History of Art and Global Trade

December 10, 2017

 

Alejandro de Ávila Blomberg of the Oaxaca Ethnobotanical Garden and Oaxaca Textile Museum will explore the historical and cultural significance of this natural crimson dye. Used from antiquity, cochineal became Mexico’s second-most valued export after silver during the Spanish colonial period.

  

 


Christian Origins in Early Modern Europe: The Birth of a New Kind of HistoryChristian Origins in Early Modern Europe: The Birth of a New Kind of History

December 7, 2017

 

In the 16th century, the unified Latin Christianity of the Middle Ages broke apart. New Protestant churches and a reformed Catholic church created new theologies, new liturgies, and new ways of imagining what early Christian life and worship were like. Anthony Grafton, professor of history at Princeton University, discusses how the new histories were ideological in inspiration and controversial in style, but nonetheless represented a vital set of innovations in western ways of thinking about and representing the past. This talk is part of the Crotty Lecture Series at The Huntington.

  

 


The Florentine Codex and the Herbal Tradition: Unknown versus Known?The Florentine Codex and the Herbal Tradition: Unknown versus Known?

December 5, 2017

 

The 16th-century ethnographic study known as the Florentine Codex included a richly detailed account of natural history of the New World. In this lecture, Alain Touwaide—historian of medicine, botany, and medicinal plants—compares the Codex and contemporary European herbal traditions. He suggests that they represent the opposition between unknown and known—a dynamic force that led to many discoveries in medicine through the centuries.

  

 


The Ecology of Eternity in a Song-Dynasty Buddhist MonasteryThe Ecology of Eternity in a Song-Dynasty Buddhist Monastery

November 21, 2017

 

In his inaugural Huntington lecture, Phillip Bloom, The Huntington’s new director of the Center for East Asian Garden Studies and curator of the Chinese Garden, examines the history of Shizhuanshan, a hilltop Buddhist sanctuary in southwestern China constructed in the late 11th century. Bloom argues that, at Shizhuanshan, architecture, image, and text work together to transform the natural environment itself into a site for the eternal performance of Buddhist ritual.

  

 


CONFERENCE | First Light: The Astronomy Century in California, 1917–2017CONFERENCE | First Light: The Astronomy Century in California, 1917–2017

November 17, 2017

 

Jointly presented by The Huntington and Carnegie Observatories, this conference marks the centennial of the completion of the 100-inch Hooker telescope on Mount Wilson, which saw “first light” in November 1917 and heralded the dawn of modern astronomy. Historians, scientists, and others explore the influence of big telescopes, the significance of discoveries at Mount Wilson, the gendered nature of astronomy, and other related issues in the history of Southern California as an arena for space exploration.

  

 


Did Early-Modern Schoolmasters Foment Sedition?Did Early-Modern Schoolmasters Foment Sedition?

November 15, 2017

 

Markku Peltonen, professor of history at the University of Helsinki and the Fletcher Jones Foundation Distinguished Fellow, discusses why the famous philosopher Thomas Hobbes (1588–1679) placed the blame for the English Civil War and Revolution of the 1640s at the door of schoolmasters. This talk is part of the Distinguished Fellow Lecture Series at The Huntington.

  

 


The Landscape Designs of Ralph CornellThe Landscape Designs of Ralph Cornell

November 12, 2017

 

Among the first generation of landscape architects in Southern California, Ralph Cornell (1890–1972) is considered the most influential. His wide scope of projects included college campuses, city parks, and significant residential commissions. Noted architect Brian Tichenor discusses Cornell’s life and milieu while examining three of his highly significant landscape designs. The lecture is presented in collaboration with the California Garden and Landscape History Society.

  

 


The Lords Proprietors: Land and Power in 17th-Century AmericaThe Lords Proprietors: Land and Power in 17th-Century America

November 8, 2017

 

If England’s King Charles II and his courtiers had had their way, most of eastern North America would have been the personal property of about a dozen men who dreamed of wielding virtually absolute power over their vast domains. Daniel K. Richter, professor of history and director of the McNeil Center for Early American Studies at the University of Pennsylvania and the Robert C. Ritchie Distinguished Fellow, explores this neglected chapter in American history and why it still matters.

  

 


Rediscovered Botanical Treasures from the Smithsonian and the Hunt InstituteRediscovered Botanical Treasures from the Smithsonian and the Hunt Institute

November 5, 2017

 

Lugene Bruno, curator of Carnegie Mellon's Hunt Institute, and Alice Tangerini, curator of botanical art at the Smithsonian Institution, present an illustrated lecture on recently rediscovered artworks long forgotten in their archives. These botanical illustrations represent significant historical and scientific findings of an earlier era.

  

 


The Originality of Milton’s “Paradise Lost”The Originality of Milton’s “Paradise Lost”

November 1, 2017

 

David Loewenstein, Erle Sparks Professor of English and Humanities at Penn State, discusses the daring originality of Milton’s “Paradise Lost.” This year marks the 350th anniversary of the great poem’s first publication in 1667. This talk is part of the Ridge Lecture Series at The Huntington.

  

 


Calder: The Conquest of TimeCalder: The Conquest of Time

October 30, 2017

 

In his groundbreaking biography of American sculptor Alexander Calder (1898–1976), author Jed Perl shows us why Calder was—and remains—a barrier breaker, an avant-garde artist with mass appeal. Perl is joined in conversation by Alexander S. C. Rower, who is both the chairman and president of the Alexander Calder Foundation and Calder’s grandson.

  

 


Seeing and Knowing: Visions of Latin American Nature, ca. 1492–1859Seeing and Knowing: Visions of Latin American Nature, ca. 1492–1859

October 16, 2017

 

Historian Daniela Bleichmar, co-curator of the exhibition “Visual Voyages: Images of Latin American Nature from Columbus to Darwin,” discusses the surprising and little-known story of the pivotal role that Latin America played in the pursuit of science and art during the first global era. This talk is part of the Wark Lecture Series at The Huntington.

  

 


CONFERENCE | The Rise of the Newspaper in Europe and America, 1600–1900CONFERENCE | The Rise of the Newspaper in Europe and America, 1600–1900

October 16, 2017

 

The newspaper rose to centrality in modern societies by making information current, critical, legitimate, and public. Leading experts on the history of the newspaper consider its invention, its layout, its appeal to sensation, and its claim to objectivity. The conference explores our debt to the newspaper and our continued need for news sources that are not “fake.” The conference was held at The Huntington Oct. 13–14, 2017.

  

 


Isherwood, Auden, and Spender Before the Second World WarIsherwood, Auden, and Spender Before the Second World War

September 25, 2017

 

Author and sculptor Matthew Spender talks about the friendship between his father, Stephen Spender, and Christopher Isherwood and W.H. Auden, from the late 1920s until Auden and Isherwood emigrated to the United States in the late 1930s. He focuses on the intense relationships between these three British writers, their homeland, and Nazi Germany. This talk is part of the Isherwood-Bachardy Lecture Series at The Huntington.

  

 


CONFERENCE | Early Modern Collections in UseCONFERENCE | Early Modern Collections in Use

September 15, 2017

 

Early modern collections played a key role in the creation and transmission of knowledge, but they are usually studied in terms of the objects they contained or how they came to exist. This conference instead explores how they were actually used in the 16th and 17th centuries. The conference was held at The Huntington Sept. 15–16, 2017.

  

 


Cartographic Traditions in East Asian MapsCartographic Traditions in East Asian Maps

September 5, 2017

 

Richard Pegg, Asian art curator of the private MacLean Collection in Chicago, discusses the similarities and differences in representations of space, both real and imagined, in early modern maps created in China, Korea, and Japan. He also examines the introduction of European map-making techniques into Asian cartographic traditions.

  

 


Kindred: A Graphic Novel AdaptationKindred: A Graphic Novel Adaptation

July 24, 2017

 

Based on the acclaimed science fiction novel Kindred by Octavia E. Butler, a new graphic adaptation by Damian Duffy and illustrator John Jennings gives fresh form to Butler’s powerful tale of slavery, time travel, and the inexorable pull of the past. Duffy and Jennings discuss the continuing relevance of Butler’s writings and how it has influenced their own work.

  

 


CONFERENCE | Octavia E. Butler Studies: Convergence of an Expanding FieldCONFERENCE | Octavia E. Butler Studies: Convergence of an Expanding Field

June 23, 2017

 

Inspired by the award-winning speculative fiction author Octavia E. Butler (1947–2006), leading experts in the field will explore the expansive ways Butler’s writing, research, and life foster deeper understanding of the past, present, and possible futures.

  

 


Carnegie Lecture Series: How We See Inside a Star with SoundCarnegie Lecture Series: How We See Inside a Star with Sound

May 15, 2017

 

Jennifer van Saders, Carnegie-Princeton Fellow, will discuss how the technique of astroseismology has revolutionized scientists’ view of the internal workings of stars.

 


CONFERENCE | Fictive Histories/Historical FictionsCONFERENCE | Fictive Histories/Historical Fictions

May 12–13, 2017

 

This interdisciplinary conference takes the recent popularity of the historical novel as a starting point to explore the relationship between history and fiction. The plenary speaker, Booker Prize-winning author Hilary Mantel (“Wolf Hall”), will appear in conversation with Mary Robertson, former Huntington chief curator of British historical manuscripts.

  

 


Hilary Mantel: 'I Met a Man Who Wasn't There.’Hilary Mantel: 'I Met a Man Who Wasn't There.’

May 11, 2017

 

The Tudor statesman Thomas Cromwell was described by an eminent historian as ’not biographable.’ Novelist Hilary Mantel describes her ten-year effort to pin her compelling and elusive subject to the page.

 


The Art of Farming: How a Farmer Sees the FutureThe Art of Farming: How a Farmer Sees the Future

May 7, 2017

 

David Mas Masumoto, organic farmer and acclaimed author of Epitaph for a Peach and Harvest Son, is joined by his wife, Marcy Masumoto, for a lively talk about life on their Central California farm. Through stories that offer a personal perspective on growing organic crops, the Masumotos share their reflections on the vision required of artisan farmers in today’s food world.

  

 


CONFERENCE | Evelyn Waugh: Reader, Writer, CollectorCONFERENCE | Evelyn Waugh: Reader, Writer, Collector

May 5-6, 2017

 

In 2013, Loren and Frances Rothschild donated their Evelyn Waugh archive to The Huntington. Now, their gift is celebrated in a symposium which brings together researchers, editors, and archival practitioners to explore the biographical and disciplinary significance of the new holdings.

  

 


Carnegie Lecture Series: Exoplanet GeneticsCarnegie Lecture Series: Exoplanet Genetics

May 1, 2017

 

Johanna Teske, Carnegie Origins Postdoctoral Fellow, will highlight new discoveries about exoplanets including how their composition is “inherited” from their host star.

 


West of Walden: Thoreau in the 21st CenturyCONFERENCE | West of Walden: Thoreau in the 21st Century

April 18, 2017

 

“The sun is but a morning star.” Walden’s famous last line points eastward to the sunrise; but Henry David Thoreau also wrote of the west, the sunset, and day’s end. To mark Thoreau’s bicentennial year, this conference poses the question: How can we read Thoreau from the sundown side, the far west of his imagination?

  

 


Simulating the Universe, One Galaxy at a TimeCarnegie Lecture Series: Simulating the Universe, One Galaxy at a Time

April 17, 2017

 

Andrew Wetzel discusses how theoretical astrophysics is now revealing how galaxies are formed, using the world’s most powerful supercomputers to simulate this complex process.

 


Potosí, Silver, and the Coming of the Modern WorldPotosí, Silver, and the Coming of the Modern World

April 12, 2017

 

John Demos, Samuel Knight Professor Emeritus of History at Yale University and the Ritchie Distinguished Fellow at The Huntington, presents an account of Potosí, the great South American silver mine and boomtown that galvanized imperial Spain in the 16th and 17th centuries, fueled the rise of capitalism, destroyed native peoples and cultures en masse, and changed history—for good or ill?

  

 


DO NOT OPEN! Investigating an Artifact from The Huntington’s VaultDO NOT OPEN! Investigating an Artifact from The Huntington’s Vault

April 11, 2017

 

The Huntington has the only known recording of Joseph H. Hazelton’s eyewitness account of the assassination of Abraham Lincoln. Aric Allen documents the story of this strange artifact.

 


Unraveling the Mysteries of Exploding StarsCarnegie Lecture Series: Unraveling the Mysteries of Exploding Stars

April 3, 2017

 

Tony Piro discusses how scientists are combining observations with theoretical modeling to unravel the mysteries of supernovae.

 


A Recipe is More than a RecipeA Recipe is More than a Recipe

March 29, 2017

 

Drawing on The Huntington’s Anne M. Cranston American Regional and Charitable Cookbook Collection, food writer Patric Kuh discusses what these shared recipes can tell us, not just about food and community but about the changes that shaped the way Americans cook.

  

 


Framing a New Elegance: The World of George T. Marsh and His Japanese HouseFraming a New Elegance: The World of George T. Marsh and His Japanese House

March 28, 2017

 

Originally conceived by art dealer George T. Marsh as an exotic setting in which to sell curiosities, the building that in 1912 became The Huntington’s Japanese House is a beautiful remnant of a transformational moment in design history. Art historian Hannah Sigur puts Marsh and his house in context, discussing the factors that helped make Japanese aesthetics the basis of good taste at the turn of the 20th century.

 

  

 


Huang Ruo and Qian YiHuang Ruo and Qian Yi

March 24, 2017

 

Composer Huang Ruo, the 2017 Cheng Family Visiting Artist at The Huntington, is joined by the acclaimed kun opera singer Qian Yi for an evening of discussion and performance. Together they explore the Chinese kun opera tradition and how Huang uses the form in his contemporary compositions.

  

 


Excavating the BookExcavating the Book

March 20, 2017

 

Stephen Orgel, J. E. Reynolds Professor in Humanities at Stanford University, discusses books and their marketing throughout history, emphasizing the ways in which books are embedded in history, and how literary interpretation is at least partly a form of archaeology. This talk is part of the Zamorano Lecture series at The Huntington.

  

Kate Sessions: A Legacy of Botanical Bounty

Kate Sessions: A Legacy of Botanical Bounty

March 20, 2017

 

Landscape historian Nancy Carol Carter examines the horticultural legacy of Kate Sessions (1857–1940), the pioneering nursery owner and garden designer who left an indelible mark on the Southern California landscape. Best known for her work in San Diego, Sessions is credited with introducing and popularizing many of the beloved tree species in the region. The lecture is presented in collaboration with the California Garden and Landscape History Society.

  

 


Alexander Calder’s Jerusalem Stabile at The HuntingtonAlexander Calder’s Jerusalem Stabile at The Huntington

March 18, 2017

 

Sandy Rower, President of the Calder Foundation, discusses the process and creation of Alexander Calder's last signed stabile. The stabile was lent to The Huntington in 2015.

 


The Chinese Question: The Gold Rushes and Global Politics

The Chinese Question: The Gold Rushes and Global Politics

March 15, 2017 

 

Mae Ngai discusses the role of Chinese miners in the 19th-century gold rushes of California, Australia, and South Africa, and the rise of anti-Chinese politics in the West.

 


A Satire of the Three EstatesA Satire of the Three Estates: Renaissance Scotland’s Best Kept Secret?

March 2, 2017

 

Greg Walker, Regius Professor of English Literature at the University of Edinburgh, discusses Sir David Lyndsay’s remarkable play, “A Satire of the Three Estates”, probably the most dramatically and politically radical piece of theater produced in 16th-century Britain.

  

Founder's Day LectureFounder's Day Lecture

Feb. 23, 2017 

 

David Zeidberg, who retires in June after 21 years as director of the Library, will look back on some of the many highlights of his career in the annual Founder’s Day lecture.

 


The Theater of Many Deeds of Blood“The Theater of Many Deeds of Blood”: The Geography of Violence in Frontier Los Angeles

Feb. 9, 2017 

 

John Mack Faragher, the Howard R. Lamar Professor Emeritus of History and American Studies at Yale University, discusses the spatial pattern of homicide in Southern California in the 19th century.

 


 

An Evening with Huang RuoAn Evening with Huang Ruo

Feb. 2, 2017

 

Composer Huang Ruo, the 2017 Cheng Family Visiting Artist at The Huntington, discusses his work, introduces Chinese opera types, and explains how he uses Chinese opera in the contemporary context. The program is the first in a series of three public presentations given by Huang during his residency.

  

Exoticum: Desert Plants and the Making of a Fine Press BookExoticum: Desert Plants and the Making of a Fine Press Book

Feb. 2, 2017

 

Printmaker and book artist Richard Wagener discusses how the visually striking plants in The Huntington’s Desert Garden have inspired his recent work. A series of his wood engravings are reproduced in a new limited edition, fine-press publication titled Exoticum: Twenty-five Desert Plants from the Huntington Gardens.

 

CONFERENCE | Religious Affections in Colonial North AmericaCONFERENCE | Religious Affections in Colonial North America

Feb. 2, 2017

 

What are “religious affections” and how have they influenced individuals, communities, and cultures? Leading experts in history, literature, and religious studies explore how religion shaped the roots, limits, and consequences of affections in the diverse terrain of early America.

 

Colonial Dreams: A French Botanist’s Encounter with Africa in the 1750sColonial Dreams: A French Botanist’s Encounter with Africa in the 1750s

Jan. 28, 2017

 

Mary Terrall, professor of the history of science at UCLA, discusses French botanist Michel Adanson, who spent almost five years in Senegal in the 1750s. Terrall reconstructs Adanson’s sojourn in a French trading post, where he studied African natural history with the help of local residents.

  

Diavolo Dance: Fluid Infinities

Diavolo Dance: Fluid Infinities

Jan. 26, 2017 

 

The acclaimed dance company Diavolo brings its performance of Fluid Infinities to The Huntington. Set on an abstract dome structure to the music of Phillip Glass, the work explores metaphors of infinite space, continuous movement, and mankind’s voyage into the unknown.


 

PBS’s “Mercy Street” and Medical Histories of the Civil WarPBS’s “Mercy Street” and Medical Histories of the Civil War

Jan. 23, 2017

 

The Huntington presents a fascinating conversation about the practice of medicine during the U.S. Civil War and its dramatization in the popular PBS series “Mercy Street.” The panel discussion is moderated by Melissa Lo, Dibner Assistant Curator or Science and Technology at The Huntington, and includes curator Olga Tsapina, who oversees The Huntington’s Civil War collections; series executive producers Lisa Wolfinger and David Zabel; and series medical history advisor Shauna Devine.

  

The Atlantic Slave Trade and the American RevolutionThe Atlantic Slave Trade and the American Revolution

Jan. 13, 2017

 

Christopher Brown, professor of history at Columbia University, explores the relationship between the Atlantic slave trade and the American Revolution, two themes that are usually treated separately.

  

The Value of Patents: A Historian’s PerspectiveThe Value of Patents: A Historian’s Perspective

Jan. 13, 2017

 

Naomi R. Lamoreaux, Stanley B. Resor Professor of Economics and History at Yale University, discusses the important ways in which patents have contributed to technological innovation over the course of U.S. history.

  

Panel Discussion: Aerospace in Southern CaliforniaPanel Discussion: Aerospace in Southern California

Dec. 16, 2016

 

The history of the aerospace industry in Southern California and its intersections with contemporary culture are the focus of this panel discussion, presented in conjunction with the exhibition of NASA’s Orbit Pavilion. Panelists are Peter Westwick, aerospace historian; William Deverell, director of the Huntington-USC Institute on California and the West; and Daniel Lewis, senior curator of the history of science and technology at The Huntington.

  

You Don’t Know JackYou Don’t Know Jack

Dec. 13, 2016

 

In recognition of the centenary of Jack London’s death, The Huntington’s Sue Hodson, curator of literary manuscripts and former Jack London Foundation Woman of the Year, speaks about Jack London as a novelist, sailor, journalist, social activist, photographer, and adventurer, as well as about the importance of The Huntington’s 50,000-item Jack London collection.

  

Sex in the CitySex in the City

Dec. 9, 2016

 

Margo Todd, Walter H. Annenberg Professor of History at the University of Pennsylvania, examines the campaign of the mostly lay judiciaries of the Calvinist Scottish church to impose a strict and highly invasive sexual discipline on their towns in the century following the Protestant Reformation.

  

SYMPOSIUM | Word and Image: Chinese Woodblock PrintsSYMPOSIUM | Word and Image: Chinese Woodblock Prints

Dec. 5, 2016

 

This symposium, organized in conjunction with the exhibition “Gardens, Art, and Commerce in Chinese Woodblock Prints,” will explore the relationship and interaction between image and text in woodblock prints during the late Ming and Qing periods.

  

The Huang Family of Block Cutters: The Thread that Binds Late Ming Pictorial Woodblock PrintmakingThe Huang Family of Block Cutters: The Thread that Binds Late Ming Pictorial Woodblock Printmaking

Dec. 1, 2016 

 

David Barker, professor of printmaking at the China National Academy of Fine Arts in Hangzhou, will consider the important contributions made to Chinese pictorial printing by the famous Huang family of artisan block cutters.

  

 


Real American Places: Edward Weston and ‘Leaves of Grass’Real American Places: Edward Weston and ‘Leaves of Grass’

Dec. 1, 2016 

 

The photographs from this exhibition illuminate an understudied chapter of Weston’s career. In 1941, the Limited Editions Book Club approached him to collaborate on a deluxe edition of Walt Whitman’s poetry collection, “Leaves of Grass.” Weston accepted the assignment and set out with his wife, Charis Wilson, on a cross-country trip that yielded a group of images that mark the culmination of an extraordinarily creative period in his career.

 


CONFERENCE | Histories of Data and the DatabaseCONFERENCE | Histories of Data and the Database

Nov. 28, 2016 

 

In the age of internet searches and social media, data has become hot—and not for the first time. An international group of historians will consider the promises, fears, practices, and technologies for recording and transmitting data in the 18th century to the present, including the implications for the lives of citizens and subjects.

  

Mapping the English VillageMapping the English Village

Nov. 10, 2016 

 

Steve Hindle, W. M. Keck Foundation Director of Research at The Huntington, explains how one particular map might be used to reconstruct who did what for a living, and who lived next door to whom, in 17th-century rural society.

  

 


What is the Orbit Pavilion?What is the Orbit Pavilion?

Nov. 11, 2016 

 

NASA Satellites that study the Earth are passing through space continuously, collecting data on everything from hurricanes to the effects of drought. What if you could make contact with these orbiting spacecraft, and bring them “down to Earth?” Visitors can do exactly that when NASA’s Orbit Pavilion sound experience touches down at The Huntington.

 


Highlights from the Fielding Collection of Early American Art: CollectingHighlights from the Fielding Collection of Early American Art: Collecting

Oct. 14, 2016 

 

Jonathan and Karin Fielding talk about what they collect and why and their interest in the pieces with respect to how they were made and how they were used. Their focus: American ingenuity manifested in American art made for utilitarian purposes by craftspeople in rural New England from the 18th through 19th centuries.

 


Ten Bamboo Studio Manual of Calligraphy and PaintingTen Bamboo Studio Manual of Calligraphy and Painting

Sept. 19, 2016 

 

June Li, co-curator of the exhibition “Gardens, Art, and Commerce in Chinese Woodblock Prints,” explains how the “Ten Bamboo Studio Manual of Calligraphy and Painting” (ca. 1633–1703) directly relates to founder Henry E. Huntington’s own scholarly mission to collect art, books, and plants.

 


LOOK>> Spelling SlipsLOOK>> Spelling Slips

Aug. 1, 2016 

 

With LOOK>>, we venture into our wide-ranging collections and bring out a single object to explore in a short video. In this installment, we look at "Criss Cross Spellings Slips," a late 19th-century parlor game.

 


Lecture: The Secret Lives of GalaxiesLecture: "The Secret Lives of Galaxies"

May 16, 2016 

 

Astronomer Katherine Alatalo tours the Hubble sequence, from "young" to "old" galaxies, exploring three avenues to galactic transitions: the quiet, slow fade; the violent merger; and the quietly violent evolution of a galaxy, likely due to a supermassive black hole in its center.

 


Lecture: ExoplanetsLecture: "Exoplanets"

May 2, 2016 

 

Astronomer Kevin Schlaufman, Carnegie-Princeton Fellow at the Carnegie Observatories, tells the story of exoplanets to date, and outlines the progress being made in the search for life elsewhere in our galaxy.

 


Lecture: A Short History of Planet FormationsLecture: "A Short History of Planet Formations"

April 18, 2016 

 

Anat Shahar, staff scientist in the geophysical laboratory at the Carnegie Institution for Science, explores terrestrial planets and discusses what laboratory experiments can reveal about the conditions that formed them.

 


Lecture: From the Big Bang to Black Holes and Gravitational WavesLecture: "From the Big Bang to Black Holes and Gravitational Waves"

March 11, 2016 

 

Kip Thorne, Feynman Professor of Theoretical Physics at Caltech, describes the ideas underlying general relativity and the amazing discoveries about warped spacetime that have been made in the past 100 years.

 


Radical ReproductionRadical Reproduction

November 9, 2016 

 

Amy Kind, professor of philosophy at Claremont McKenna College, and Shelley Streeby, professor of ethnic studies and literature at the University of California, San Diego, explore futuristic notions of family and reproduction in the work of science fiction author Octavia Butler.

 

The Cutter IncidentThe Cutter Incident

November 9, 2016 

 

Neal Nathanson M.D., discusses a 1955 incident in which Cutter Laboratories of Berkeley, Calif., inadvertently released batches of polio vaccine that contained the live virus. Nathanson also provides an update on efforts toward global eradication of poliomyelitis.

 

Painters, Carvers, and Style in Chinese Woodblock Printed ImagesPainters, Carvers, and Style in Chinese Woodblock Printed Images

October 28, 2016 

 

Suzanne Wright, associate professor of art history at the University of Tennessee, discusses the partnerships between Chinese painters and woodblock carvers who worked together to produce prints of exquisite beauty in the Ming and Qing dynasties.

 

The New Battlefield History of the American RevolutionThe New Battlefield History of the American Revolution

October 28, 2016 

 

Woody Holton, professor of American history at the University of South Carolina, offers a preview of research from his forthcoming book about the battlefields of the American Revolution.

 

CONFERENCE | Early Modern Literary GeographiesCONFERENCE | Early Modern Literary Geographies

October 24, 2016 

 

Experts in the literature, history, geography, and archaeology of 16th- and 17th-century Britain examine four key geographic sites—body, house, neighborhood, and region—to illuminate the important spatial structures and concepts that define the early modern engagement with the world.

 

Is a Picture Worth a Thousand Words? Chinese Woodblock Prints of the Late Ming and Qing PeriodsIs a Picture Worth a Thousand Words? Chinese Woodblock Prints of the Late Ming and Qing Periods

October 7, 2016 

 

June Li, curator emerita of the Chinese Garden at The Huntington, will look at some of the functions of printed images in China from the late 16th through the 19th centuries, using examples from the exhibition “Gardens, Art, and Commerce in Chinese Woodblock Prints.”

 

The United States from the Inside Out and Southside NorthThe United States from the Inside Out and Southside North

October 7, 2016 

 

Steven Hahn, professor of history at New York University and the Rogers Distinguished Fellow at The Huntington, considers what the history of the United States would look like, especially for the 19th century, if we travel east and west from the middle of the country and north from Mexico and the Caribbean.

 

Becoming Gay in the 1960s: Reading “A Single Man”Becoming Gay in the 1960s: Reading “A Single Man”

October 7, 2016 

 

Novelist Edmund White (A Boy’s Own Story) discusses the lasting impression that Christopher Isherwood’s groundbreaking novel “A Single Man” had on him as a young author assembling his gay identity in the pre-Stonewall era.

 

The Good GardenThe Good Garden

October 6, 2016 

 

Landscape architect Edmund Hollander, author of “The Good Garden,” discusses how the design process for a residential landscape is informed by the interaction of natural site ecology, architectural ecology, and human ecology.

 

Physics and “Belles Lettres”: The Arts & the Sciences in the Industrial RevolutionPhysics and “Belles Lettres”: The Arts & the Sciences in the Industrial Revolution

September 27, 2016 

 

Jon Mee, professor of 18th-century studies at the University of York and the R. Stanton Avery Distinguished Fellow at The Huntington, discusses the network of literary and philosophical societies that sprang up in response to the transformative experience of the industrial revolution in the north of England between 1780 and 1830.

 

CONFERENCE | Ben Jonson, 1616–2016CONFERENCE | Ben Jonson, 1616–2016

September 26, 2016 

 

To mark the 400th anniversary of the publication of the landmark folio “The Works of Ben Jonson,” experts in the field explore the English dramatist’s impact in his own time and his reputation down to the present.

 

CONFERENCE | The Complete Street: Wrongs and Rights of WayCONFERENCE | The Complete Street: Wrongs and Rights of Way

September 21, 2016 

 

The Los Angeles Region Planning History Group presents a symposium examining the Complete Streets movement. Speakers discuss how urban planners are exploring ways to recapture the public rights of way for pedestrians, bicycles, and public transit.

 

The Strange Career of William Ellis: The Texas Slave Who Became a Mexican MillionaireThe Strange Career of William Ellis: The Texas Slave Who Became a Mexican Millionaire

September 20, 2016 

 

Karl Jacoby, professor of history at Columbia University, uses the story of the remarkable Gilded Age border crosser William Ellis to discuss the shifting relationship between the United States and Mexico in the late 19th century. This talk is part of the Billington Lecture series at The Huntington.

 

LISTEN>> Caring for a CollectionLISTEN>> Caring for a Collection

September 1, 2016 

 

In this LISTEN>> segment, visiting journalist Corinne DeWitt meets up with book conservator Kristi Westberg to learn a bit about what goes into caring for The Huntington’s history of science collections.

 

Explorations in the History of the Rose in ChinaExplorations in the History of the Rose in China

June 9, 2016 

 

Guoliang Wang, the author of "Old Roses of China,” surveys the development of the rose in China, from the Song dynasty (960–1279) to the Qing dynasty (1644–1911) and beyond. Wang is a professor of horticulture with the Jiangsu Provincial Commission of Agriculture and a lecturer at both Nanjing University and Nanjing Agricultural University. His research has focused particularly on wild roses and ancient horticultural varieties.

 

LISTEN>> Japanese Tea CeremonyLISTEN>> Japanese Tea Ceremony

June 3, 2016

 

Visiting journalist Corinne DeWitt heads to the Seifu-an tea house in the Japanese Garden, where Robert Hori, gardens cultural curator, performs a traditional Japanese tea ceremony and discusses the intricacies of this venerable art form.

 

 


Let the People RuleLet the People Rule

May 25, 2016 

 

Geoffrey Cowan, president of the Annenberg Foundation Trust at Sunnylands, discusses his book “Let the People Rule: Theodore Roosevelt and the Birth of the Presidential Primary.”

 

 


Japanese Gardens of Manzanar: Past, Present, and FutureJapanese Gardens of Manzanar: Past, Present, and Future

May 24, 2016 

 

Jeffery Burton, archaeologist at the Manzanar National Historic Site, examines traces of the gardens, which were lost and abandoned when the site was closed.

 

Colonial Dreams: A French Botanist’s Encounter with Africa in the 1750sColonial Dreams: A French Botanist’s Encounter with Africa in the 1750s

January 28, 2017

 

Mary Terrall, professor of the history of science at UCLA, discusses French botanist Michel Adanson, who spent almost five years in Senegal in the 1750s. Terrall reconstructs Adanson’s sojourn in a French trading post, where he studied African natural history with the help of local residents.

  

About The Huntington

The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens is a collections-based research and educational institution established in 1919 by Henry E. and Arabella Huntington. Henry Huntington, a key figure in the...

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