Navigate

Press Release - Bank of America Supports Conservation of The Blue Boy

 

August 3, 2017

 

The Blue Boy, (ca. 1770), Thomas Gainsborough (1727–1788), oil on canvas, 70 5/8 x 48 3/4 in. The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens

The Blue Boy, (ca. 1770), Thomas Gainsborough (1727–1788), oil on canvas, 70 5/8 x 48 3/4 in. The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens

 

SAN MARINO, CA—Thanks to a grant from Bank of America, The Blue Boy, one of the most famous paintings in British and American history made around 1770 by Thomas Gainsborough (1727–1788), will undergo its first major technical examination and conservation treatment. Project Blue Boy begins on Aug. 8, 2017, when the life-size image of a young man in an iconic blue satin costume goes off public view for preliminary conservation analysis until Nov. 1. The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens, home to The Blue Boy since its acquisition in 1921, will conduct the conservation project over a two-year period, with the final portion taking place in public view, in a year-long exhibition, also called Project Blue Boy, presented from Sept. 2018 to Sept. 2019 in the Thornton Portrait Gallery, where the painting traditionally hangs.

 

The grant is part of the Bank of America Art Conservation Project, a program that provides grants to nonprofit museums throughout the world to conserve historically or culturally significant works of art that are in danger of deterioration. Since the program’s launch in 2010, Bank of America has provided grants to museums in 30 countries supporting over 100 conservation projects.

 

“We are enormously grateful for the support of Bank of America on the conservation of such an important work in our collection,” said Catherine Hess, interim director of the art collections and chief curator of European art at The Huntington.

 

“Bank of America recognizes that the arts matter, and is committed to preserving the world’s cultural treasures,” said Raul A. Anaya, Los Angeles market president of Bank of America. “We are delighted to include The Blue Boy in the Art Conservation Project. Since 2010, this project has helped to restore or conserve thousands of important cultural treasurers in more than 30 countries. This is such an iconic work and we’re proud to support the conservation efforts that will help restore it for future generations.”

 

The works of art that received support from the Bank of America Art Conservation Project in 2016 include a painting by Claude Monet at the Kimbell Art Museum in Fort Worth, Texas; an Andy Warhol piece at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; three paintings at the Salvador Dalí Museum in St. Petersburg, Florida; and a sixth-century haniwa (terracotta tomb figure) at the Tokyo National Museum—the only example of haniwa designated as a National Treasure. More information on the Bank of America Art Conservation Project is available at www.bankofamerica.com/arts.

 

# # #

 

Contacts
Thea M. Page, 626-405-2260, tpage@huntington.org
Lisa Blackburn, 626-405-2140, lblackburn@huntington.org

 

About The Huntington
The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens is a collections-based research and educational institution serving scholars and the general public. More information about The Huntington can be found online at huntington.org

 

Visitor Information
The Huntington is located at 1151 Oxford Rd., San Marino, Calif., 12 miles from downtown Los Angeles. It is open to the public every day except Tuesday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Closed Tuesdays and major holidays. Visitors can enjoy a variety of dining options on site, including the 1919 café, the Chinese Garden’s Freshwater Dumpling and Noodle House, and the Rose Garden Tea Room. Information: 626-405-2100 or huntington.org.

 

About The Huntington

The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens is a collections-based research and educational institution established in 1919 by Henry E. and Arabella Huntington. Henry Huntington, a key figure in the...

Read More