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Press Release - The Year Ahead at The Huntington

August 08, 2013

 

Fall 2013: Two major international loan exhibitions and the complete re-installation of the Library’s Main Exhibition Hall

 

Winter–Summer 2014: “Archimedes Palimpsest” from the Walters Art Museum, and dramatically expanded American art galleries

 


SAN MARINO, Calif.—Visitors to The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens this fall are in for a treat—several of them, in fact. With a landmark exhibition marking the 300th anniversary of the birth of Junípero Serra (founder of the California missions), an international exhibition of Renaissance paintings and the opening of a dynamically re-envisioned new installation of the Library’s most valued objects, there will be something to dazzle everyone. Then, in spring of 2014, The Huntington will present an exhibition on the mysterious “Archimedes Palimpsest,” revealing text from the ancient world discovered through conservation and imaging, on tour from the Walters Art Museum, Baltimore. And in the summer of 2014, The Huntington will open a new wing for the display of its permanent collections, adding 5,000 feet of display space to the Virginia Steele Scott Galleries of American Art.

[EDITOR’S NOTE: Advance exhibition schedule follows. Information subject to change. Please call or visit huntington.org for confirmation. High-resolution digital images available on request for publicity use.]


Exhibition Schedule through July 2014


New in Fall 2013


Junípero Serra and the Legacies of the California Missions nJunípero Serra and the Legacies of the California Missions

Aug. 17, 2013–Jan. 6, 2014

Virginia Steele Scott Galleries of American Art, Erburu Wing

The 300th anniversary of the birth of one of the most influential, yet least understood, figures in California history will be marked by a major exhibition presented exclusively at The Huntington. With nearly 250 objects drawn from The Huntington’s collections and those of some 60 international lenders, “Junípero Serra and the Legacies of the California Missions” is the first to present an in-depth portrait of the founder of the California mission system. It will examine the early modern Catholic worlds of Spain and Mexico where Serra (1713–1784) was born, lived, and worked; the ways in which Native American life and culture were at the center of Serra’s missions; and the emergence of competing versions of Serra’s legacy through time. The exhibition will coincide with the publication of Junípero Serra: California's Founding Father (Hill & Wang) by exhibition co-curator Steven Hackel, professor of history at the University of California, Riverside.

 


Face to Face: Flanders, Florence, and Renaissance Painting Face to Face: Flanders, Florence, and Renaissance Painting

Sept. 28, 2013–Jan. 13, 2014

MaryLou and George Boone Gallery

While many exhibitions have shed light on the beauty of Flemish 15th-century painting, and even more have celebrated the glory of Italian Renaissance art, “Face to Face: Flanders, Florence, and Renaissance Painting” will be the first in the United States to explore how Flemish artists helped make the innovative, sophisticated, and beautiful works of the Italian Renaissance possible. With 29 paintings and six illuminated manuscripts by artists such as Jan van Eyck, Hans Memling, Pietro Perugino, and Domenico Ghirlandaio drawn from The Huntington’s collections and those of several other institutions in the United States and Europe, the exhibition will mark the first time viewers in the Los Angeles area will be able to see The Huntington’s acclaimed Virgin and Child (ca. 1460) by Flemish painter Rogier van der Weyden (ca. 1400–1464) displayed alongside its companion diptych panel, Portrait of Philippe de Croÿ, on loan from the Royal Museum of Fine Arts in Antwerp, Belgium. “Face to Face” is co-curated by Catherine Hess, chief curator of European art at The Huntington, and Paula Nuttall, author of From Flanders to Florence: The Impact of Netherlandish Painting, 1400–1500 (2004, Yale University Press) and Face to Face: Flanders, Florence, and Renaissance Painting, published by The Huntington on the occasion of this exhibition.

 


Crossing the Alps: Artistic Exchange and the Printed Image in Renaissance EuropeCrossing the Alps: Artistic Exchange and the Printed Image in Renaissance Europe
Sept. 28, 2013–Jan. 13, 2014
Huntington Art Gallery, Works on Paper Room

Presented concurrently with “Face to Face: Flanders, Florence, and Renaissance Painting” this focused exhibition displays 15 works by Flemish, Dutch, German, and Italian artists from The Huntington’s collections. Artists include Albrecht Dürer (1471–1528), Marcantonio Raimondi (ca.1480–ca.1534), and Lucas van Leyden (1494–1533), who made and disseminated prints after, or were inspired by, works of art produced in other countries. Reproductive, inexpensive, and portable, printed images have been agents of artistic exchange in the West since the late 15th century, when the development of new and efficient printing techniques began to provide artists with a larger array of images than ever before. In addition to individual prints, the exhibition will feature illustrated printed books from The Huntington’s Library holdings. Like prints, these books were easy to transport, which helped transfer knowledge and new ideas to an international audience.

 


Library Main Hall Renovated and Reinstalled Library Main Hall Renovated and Reinstalled
“Remarkable Works, Remarkable Times: Highlights from the Huntington Library”
Opens Nov. 9, 2013

The Main Exhibition Hall of The Huntington’s historic Library building reopens this fall after renovation with a new, dynamic permanent installation designed to invigorate visitors’ sense of connection to history and literature and to highlight the significance and uses of the Library’s incomparable collections of historical materials. The Huntington’s Library is one of the largest and most complete independent research libraries in the United States in its fields of specialization, including British and American history and literature. The new permanent installation, titled “Remarkable Works, Remarkable Times: Highlights from the Huntington Library,” spotlights 12 key works in vignettes organized chronologically. Major items on display include the Ellesmere manuscript of Geoffrey Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, the Gutenberg Bible, William Shakespeare’s First Folio, John James Audubon’s Birds of America, and Henry David Thoreau’s manuscript of Walden. The exhibition holds some 150 objects representing the Library’s growing collection, now numbering about 9 million items. Each vignette incorporates other rare works to reflect the time and context in which they were made, prompting visitors to consider the wider world being presented. The goal is to provide unexpected juxtapositions and new insights into the collections, and into history itself.


Sargent Claude Johnson: A Masterpiece RestoredSargent Claude Johnson: A Masterpiece Restored
Oct. 12, 2013–Jan. 20, 2014
Virginia Steele Scott Galleries of American Art, Susan and Stephen Chandler Wing

Best known for his imagery of animals and people, particularly African and Native Americans, rendered in Abstract Figurative and early modern styles, Sargent Claude Johnson (1888–1967) was one of the first African American artists in California to achieve a national reputation. He worked as a painter, printmaker, and ceramicist, but is best known as a sculptor.  Under the auspices of the Federal Arts Project (FAP), Johnson carved a 22-foot-long redwood relief of musicians, animals, birds, and plants as a screen for a pipe organ in the music hall of the California School for the Blind in Berkeley. The organ screen was removed from its original building after the California School of the Blind moved to a new campus in 1980 and was not seen by the public for more than 30 years. The exhibition presents this monumental sculpture, acquired by the Huntington in 2011, for the first time since its restoration, along with details of the restoration project. 


 

Spring–Summer 2014


Lost and Found: The Secrets of ArchimedesLost and Found: The Secrets of Archimedes
March 15–June 8, 2014
MaryLou and George Boone Gallery

Archimedes lived in the Greek city of Syracuse in the third century B.C.E. He was a brilliant mathematician, physicist, inventor, engineer, and astronomer. In 10th-century Constantinople (present day Istanbul), an anonymous scribe copied Archimedes' treatises in the original Greek onto parchment. In the 13th century, a monk erased the Archimedes text, cut the pages along the center fold, rotated the leaves 90 degrees and folded them in half. The parchment was then recycled, together with the parchment of other books, to create a Greek Orthodox prayer book. This process of reuse is called palimpsesting; the result of the process is a palimpsest. In 1999, the Walters Art Museum in Baltimore and a team of researchers began a project to read the erased texts of the Archimedes Palimpsest—the oldest surviving copy of works by the greatest mathematical genius of antiquity. Over 12 years, many techniques were employed  by more than 80 scientists and scholars in the fields of conservation, imaging, and classical studies. The Walters presented the exhibition “Lost and Found: The Secrets of Archimedes” in 2011; it comes to The Huntington in spring 2014 to complement the Library’s history of science collections and to tell the story of the Archimedes Palimpsest’s journey and the discovery of new scientific, philosophical, and political texts from the ancient world. The manuscript demonstrates that Archimedes discovered the mathematics of infinity, mathematical physics, and combinatorics—a branch of mathematics used in modern computing.


The Virginia Steele Scott Galleries of American Art—ExpandedThe Virginia Steele Scott Galleries of American Art—Expanded
Opens July 2014


First opened in 1984, and expanded in 2009, The Huntington’s Virginia Steele Scott Galleries of American Art are growing again—this time into a 5,400-square-foot space in the Lois and Robert F. Erburu wing that was previously used for storage. Recent major acquisitions, such as a carved organ screen by Depression-era African American artist Sargent Claude Johnson (1888–1967), The Locomotive by Reginald Marsh (1898–1954), and Global Loft (Spread) by Robert Rauschenberg (1925–2008), will join loans and works from The Huntington’s permanent collection to tell an expanded story of American art from the colonial period to the 20thth century.


Now on View

 
Illuminated Palaces: Extra-Illustrated Books from the Huntington LibraryIlluminated Palaces: Extra-Illustrated Books from the Huntington Library
July 27–Oct. 28, 2013
Library, West Hall


 

Useful Hours: Needlework and Painted Textiles from Southern California CollectionsUseful Hours: Needlework and Painted Textiles from Southern California Collections
June 1–Sept. 2, 2013
Virginia Steele Scott Galleries of American Art, Susan and Stephen Chandler Wing

 


Revisiting The Cottage Door: Gainsborough’s Masterpiece in FocusRevisiting The Cottage Door: Gainsborough’s Masterpiece in Focus
June 1–Dec. 2, 2013
Huntington Art Gallery
 


Gainsborough in Print: Selections from The Huntington’s Art CollectionsGainsborough in Print: Selections from The Huntington’s Art Collections
June 22–Sept. 23, 2013
Huntington Art Gallery, Works on Paper Room
 

 
Form and Landscape: Southern California Edison and the Los Angeles Basin, 1940–1990Form and Landscape: Southern California Edison and the Los Angeles Basin, 1940–1990
May 1–Dec. 31, 2013
Online Exhibition Only 

 

 

 


CONTACTS:   Thea M. Page, 626-405-2260, tpage@huntington.org
                         Lisa Blackburn, 626-405-2140, lblackburn@huntington.org

 

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About The Huntington
The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens is a collections-based research and educational institution serving scholars and the general public. More information about The Huntington can be found online at huntington.org.

Visitor Information
The Huntington is located at 1151 Oxford Rd., San Marino, Calif., 12 miles from downtown Los Angeles. It is open to the public Monday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday from noon to 4:30 p.m.; and Saturday, Sunday, and Monday holidays from 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Summer hours (Memorial Day through Labor Day) are 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Closed Tuesdays and major holidays. Admission on weekdays: $20 adults, $15 seniors (65+), $12 students (ages 12–18 or with full-time student I.D.), $8 youth (ages 5–11), free for children under 5. Group rate, $11 per person for groups of 15 or more. Members are admitted free. Admission on weekends: $23 adults, $18 seniors, $13 students, $8 youth, free for children under 5. Group rate, $14 per person for groups of 15 or more. Members are admitted free. Admission is free to all visitors on the first Thursday of each month with advance tickets. Information: 626-405-2100 or huntington.org.

About The Huntington

The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens is a collections-based research and educational institution established in 1919 by Henry E. and Arabella Huntington. Henry Huntington, a key figure in the...

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